Landscape Policy | City of Casey
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20 October 2010

Landscape Policy

1.3

Application requirements

As part of Council’s commitment to creating diverse, innovative, quality landscaped environments, Landscape Guidelines have been developed to provide information on preparing and submitting landscape plans as part of the planning permit application process. These guidelines include information on:

  • Casey’s physical characteristics
  • Features to assess when preparing a plan
  • Landscape design principles
  • Plant selection
  • Recommended plants
  • Landscape maintenance

If works require a planning permit, then it is likely that a landscape plan will also be required to be submitted to Council for approval, refer Figure 1. There are a number of types of landscape plans which are appropriate, depending on the type and scale of the project. (refer Section 2 for further descriptions). The table below indicates which type of landscape plan would be required. Council reserves the right to require the submission of any or all of these landscape plans as part of a planning permit application.

Table 1 Type of Landscape Plan Required

Development Categories

SiteAnalysis

Landscape Master Plan

DetailedLandscape Plan

Dwelling House, Single Dwelling

ü

 

ü

Residential Unit Development <5 dwellings

ü

 

ü

Residential Unit Development > 5 dwellings

ü

ü

ü

Change of Use

ü

 

ü

Place of Assembly

ü

 

ü

Leisure and Recreation facility

ü

 

ü

Display Homes/Sales Office

ü

 

ü

Commercial Development <$10 million

ü

ü

ü

Commercial Development >$10 million

ü

ü

ü

Industrial Development <$10 million

ü

ü

ü

Industrial Development >$10 million

ü

ü

ü

Subdivision, rural residential

ü

 

ü

Subdivision, existing buildings

ü

 

ü

Subdivision <50 lots

ü

 

ü

Subdivision >50 lots

ü

ü

ü

Community Buildings

ü

 

ü

Vegetation removal

ü

 

ü

Overlays, buildings and works

ü

 

ü

Figure 1

So you have your planning permit what’s next?

(INSERT IMAGE: FIGURE 1)

Introduction

The City of Casey covers a large physical area and encompasses a rich tapestry of diverse landforms, ecosystems and vegetation types. Casey includes historic, established and developing suburbs, foothill communities, rural farm landscapes and coastal villages.

Casey is one of the largest Municipalities Victoria and has one of the fastest growth rates in Australia. It is our responsibility to protect, maintain and enhance our local environment, heritage and culture, while continuing to encourage sustainable development and growth. A well design and maintained landscape has the potential to improve the streets and properties. It defines character and creates place. It can be used to highlight significant features or screen unsightly elements. The role of landscape in the way people experience Casey is integral in a number of ways including; linking people to the past uses of the area, creating spaces that are enjoyable and usable, creating attractive safe spaces, and positively impact on the environment in which people live and work.

This policy articulates Casey’s landscape vision, and provides clear guidelines of the City’s requirements for the preservation and enhancement of our existing and new landscapes.

This policy supports the implementation of a range of other Casey strategies and policies and provides a guide for Council, developers and residents. It contains guidelines for the design of public open spaces, as well as private properties and streetscape works required for planning and subdivision approvals.

This document is separated into nine sections:

  • Section 1 - Introductory section outlining the aims and objectives of the Landscape Policy while referencing the many policies and strategies that influence its content.
  • Section 2 - contains the specific requirements for each type of landscape plan.
  • Section 3 - details the general landscape requirements common to most situations such as, planting, garden bed preparation, paving, car parking, driveway, drainage, irrigation, sustainability and maintenance.
  • Section 4 - 9 - provides specific design requirements for the following specific development types. These provide clear guidance as to what standard is expected in each category.
Residential Section 4
Industrial Section 5
Commercial Section 6
Community Developments Section 7
Subdivisions Section 8
Public Open Space Section 9

Context

1.1 Casey’s Landscapes

The varied landscapes found throughout the City of Casey help to provide definition and character to its communities.

Geographically, Casey has a diverse landform, ranging from the hills and valleys of the foothills of the Dandenong Ranges to the north, through the sweeping fertile open grassland plateau at its centre, to the rich mangroves and coastal marshes of Western Port to the south.

The foothills region with its steeper topography and scattered remnant vegetation has expansive views and a semi rural atmosphere. The grassy plains on the other hand, where most development has occurred to date, are punctuated by broad open space corridors and wetlands along natural drainage lines, featuring remnant River Red Gum trees and gently undulating topography. Further south, the landscape gives way to sandy soils and a flourishing agricultural industry with scattered stands of remnant vegetation.

The coastal villages and coastal fringe are nestled between large areas of remnant heathy woodland, cleared grazing land and internationally recognised mangroves and coastal ecosystems

1.2 The Importance of Landscape

Urbanisation and agricultural practices have resulted in a reduction in biodiversity as urban areas encroach upon and change natural environments. Other side effects include increased pollution, a reduction in open space and pressure on natural resources. All of these have an impact on the health and wellbeing of people living in urban areas - one in four people in the world now suffers respiratory problems.

Trees, shrubs and grasses in the urban environs can all play a role in addressing these issues as they absorb and filter air pollutants and improve air quality. Similarly, vegetation can also be used to filter pollutants from runoff water before it enters natural water systems such as wetlands, creeks, streams and underground aquifers.

Landscape elements such as patches and strips of native vegetation, agricultural land, wetlands and streams, and human settlements, together form a complex environment that supports many species of native fauna. For most species, single remnants of bush are not enough for viable populations to survive in the long term; they need networks of habitat through the landscape. Many species use the whole landscape, moving between landscape elements on a daily, seasonal or irregular basis.

The land use surrounding remnants of native vegetation also influences the species capable of using that remnant. A total of 34 Ecological Vegetation Classes (EVCs) have been recorded. All extant EVCs are now considered Vulnerable or Endangered in the

 

City of Casey, and an estimated 24% of the EVCs are extinct in the area. Ultimately, the diversity and abundance of native wildlife depends on the amount, type and arrangement of native vegetation in the landscape.

Wetlands also play a valuable role in the landscape. During extended dry periods they provide habitat and refuge within a dry landscape. A wide range of threatened plants and animals depend on healthy wetlands for their survival.

Wetlands assist in moderating floods and erosion by holding and slowly releasing large volumes of water. They also perform important natural functions such as stabilising shorelines, maintaining water flows, and purifying waterways by filtering sediments and recycling nutrients.

The coastal fringe of Casey is bordered by Western Port with sections of the coast line internationally recognised and protected as a Ramsar1 site. Alterations to water quality inland have a direct impact on this fragile coast line. It is vital that development and land practices within the municipality consider and address water quality issues.

Plantings on private property also play an important part in the visual image of an area, both supporting the public landscape and at times providing highlights

Roadside vegetation, whether native or not, also makes a major contribution to landscape character and aesthetic quality. It can act as a valuable windbreak or shelterbelt for adjoining farmland, as well as providing habitat and aiding in the reduction of air and water borne pollutants. Roadsides retain a substantial proportion of the remaining native vegetation in Casey and some roadside sections are highly significant for their natural values. The City of Casey has developed Strategies for planting on roadsides; Casey Arterial Roads Strategy, Casey Connector Road Strategy and Casey Local Road Street Tree Strategy.

1.3 Aims

The Landscape Policy aims to:

  • Promote the development of landscapes which contribute positively to the image of Casey.
  • Encourage the establishment of a treed landscape which reinforces the indigenous and cultural planting of the locality.
  • Create a leafy image within Casey’s streetscapes, open spaces and private properties.
  • Encourage the use of indigenous species for their hardiness and beauty, and connection to the environmental history of the area; whilst embracing a broad range of species which reflect the cultural history of our area.
  • Retain and protect existing vegetation which contributes habitat, ecological, visual or heritage value.
  • Provide a foundation for the incorporation of sustainable landscapes in all Council projects.
  • Ensure quality sustainable landscapes are developed throughout Casey.
  • Provide a foundation for the incorporation of sustainable landscapes in all Council projects.

1 a particularly good representative of a natural or near-natural wetland characteristic of one, or common to more than one, biogeographical region

1.4 Objectives

The objectives of this policy are to:

  • Provide a comprehensive, practical and authoritative guide to the landscape approval process associated with planning and subdivision proposals from inception to completion for residents, developers, consultants, contractors and Council officers.
  • Introduce procedures to expedite approval processes.
  • Implement State and National standards for design and construction where applicable.
  • Specify comprehensive requirements for all types of landscape works within Casey.

1.5 Policy Context

The following provide the foundation for this policy:

1.5.1 State Policies

Melbourne 2030

Landscape design initiatives are to:

  • Provide leadership in sustainable urban design and integrated place management.
  • Review and revise urban design guidelines for incorporation in the planning system.
  • Develop and apply performance criteria and standards for safety, surveillance, noise, amenity and privacy for subdivision and new development not covered by ResCode.
  • Develop urban design projects with local government and other partners to apply good urban design principles.
  • Provide assistance to local councils for projects to improve landscape qualities, open space linkages and environmental performance in green wedges, conservation areas and non-urban areas.

Safer Design Guidelines for Victoria

The State Government has released a policy to encourage safety conscious design. The principles of this policy are critical considerations for any landscape design work and represent one of the core values of this policy.

Healthy by Design Policy

The State Government has released a policy to encourage health conscious design. The principles of this Policy are critical considerations for any landscape design work and represent one of the core values of this policy.

Native Vegetation Management – A Framework for Action

This State Government document establishes the strategic direction for the protection, enhancement and re-establishment of native vegetation across Victoria.

Casey Planning Scheme

The statutory planning codes that set out policies and provisions for the use, development and protection of land.

1.5.2 Council Policies

Casey C21 Strategy

Casey C21: A Vision for Casey’s Future provides an integrated city development framework for land use, community development, environment, economic development, provision of infrastructure, opportunities for recreation and leisure and a full range of people services. The strategy considers these over three timeframes: the next five years (the needs of the current community); twenty five years (the next generation); and fifty- one hundred years (future generations).

Council Plan 2009 - 2013

This five year Council plan sets out the the following landscape related goals:

  • Protect and enhance the natural environment.
  • Preserve our indigenous flora and fauna.
  • Develop awareness and encourage involvement of the community in the preservation and improvement of the natural environment.
  • Support other agencies to manage catchments and enhance waterways and the coastline, with an emphasis on climate change impacts.
  • Lead by example in the conservation of resources through the encouragement of water wise gardens, use of water tanks and solar panels and the use of environmentally sustainable building practices.

Other Local Policies, Strategies and References

This policy integrates elements from a range of Council documents which support implementation of Council’s C21 Strategy. Current versions of all strategies and policies can be downloaded from http://www.casey.vic.gov.au/policiesstrategies/?nav=pdm or hard copies can be requested from the Council Customer Service Offices.

Where an application is required to comply with information contained in a Casey policy or strategy in excess of the information provided in this document, this will be specifically advised during the application process.

Landscape Plan Requirements

The following information is provided to assist in the preparation of all landscape plans required by Council through planning permit applications or subdivision approval processes.

Landscape plans which are non compliant with the requirements outlined in this policy will be deemed unsatisfactory and will require amendments/additions prior to resubmission. Applicants will be advised of the changes required.

Landscape plans must be prepared by a suitably qualified landscape professional to the satisfaction of Council. This includes professionals with qualifications and/or extensive experience in the following fields; landscape architecture, landscape planning, landscape design, environmental science, or horticulture.

2.1 Types of Landscape Plans

The types of landscape plans required for a project depend on the nature and scale of the proposed development. Developments of large scales may be subject to further requirements such as larger buffers etc. Refer to table 1 (page 2) for a guide to what type of landscape plan is required for specific development types. Plans may be required to be submitted to Council to satisfy planning requirements for any, or all, of the following stages in the design process:

  • Site Analysis.
  • Landscape Master Plan.
  • Detailed Landscape Plan.

All plans are to be submitted through Council’s Statutory Planning Department. These plans are enforceable and must be adhered too.

2.1.1 Site Analysis

An initial Site Analysis is required to be prepared and submitted with all planning permit applications. A Site Analysis is integral to the landscape design process, as it identifies landscape issues

relating to the development which may impact on the existing amenity, character and use of the surrounding area.

Information relating to the retention or removal of existing vegetation must also be included in the Site Analysis. Wherever possible and practical, existing trees and stands of vegetation should be preserved.

(INSERT IMAGE HERE)

A survey of existing vegetation including significant trees, groups of remnant vegetation (including trees, shrubs or grasslands) and any significant cultural plantings must be undertaken. The survey must include all vegetation on the subject site and within 3 metres of the boundaries on adjoining sites (including road reserve), and also any vegetation with a canopy that impinges on the site. This information is required to be compiled by a suitably qualified professional such as an Arborist or Botanist. An Ecologist may be engaged to undertake surveys of areas such as Grasslands. A site plan showing the exact location of existing vegetation proposed to be retained or removed, including details on the level at its base, trunk diameter, canopy spread, botanical and common name and an arboricultural assessment of each tree in regard to health, heritage, cultural and aesthetic value must be submitted to Council as part of the Site Analysis.

Where significant remnant vegetation is proposed to be retained or removed and/or significant changes to ground levels are proposed, a Management Plan and Tree Impact Study (as per Casey Tree Manual) for the protection or reinstatement of this vegetation may also be required by Council.

2.1.2 Landscape Master Plan

The Landscape Master Plan should give a clear picture of the completed development including the intent for character / function / amenity and must include the following:

  • Existing site information - north point, structures, boundaries, fences, services, contours, easements and existing vegetation.
  • Proposed site elements - structures, buildings, roadways, car parks and footpaths.
  • All areas to be landscaped and their proposed treatment - planting beds, paving, lawns etc.
  • Planting design with an indicative species list.

(INSERT IMAGE HERE)

2.1.3 Detailed Landscape Plan

Detailed Landscape Plans are usually submitted for approval in response to a condition on a Planning Permit, which must be met prior to the commencement of any works. They must be technically drafted and contain enough information for construction works to proceed.

Required information should include:

  • A site survey including:
    • botanical names and locations of all existing vegetation indicating what is to be retained and/or removed;
    • the location of buildings and vegetation within 3.0m of the boundary on adjoining properties and also any vegetation with a canopy that impinges on the site;
    • details of any vegetation that is likely to be affected by the proposed development; and
    • location of all services and easements.
  • A plan identifying all proposed plants by either their full botanical name, or a coding notated on the plan and referenced in a planting schedule.
  • A detailed plan schedule:
    • divided into trees, shrubs, groundcovers, climbers, etc
    • botanical names in alphabetical order and used in conjunction with common names in the plant schedule
    • quantity and pot size of each individual speicies used in the planting design
    • approximate calliper size at planing for trees only in pot size >200mm
    • height at planing for trees only in pot size >200mm
    • spaces of all speicies
    • mature height and spread of all plants
  • Details of paths and driveways including:
    • paving materials
    • paving styles
    • surface finishes
    • colours
  • Location of outdoor structures:
    • storage facilities
    • clotheslines
    • watertanks
    • rubbish bins
  • Location and details of garden edging.
  • Details of hard landscaping elements, including:
    • retaining walls
    • shade structures
  • Proposed irrigation
    • only irrigation sourced from a recycled water source will be approved by Council.

 

3 General Requirements For All Landscape Plans

3.1 Plan Quality

  • Drawing line work must be legible and able to be photocopied in black and white.
  • Text must be easily read whether hand written, typed or stencilled.

3.2 Sheet Size and Scale

Sheet Sizes and Scales are indicative only. These may vary depending on the size and scope of individual projects. Scale drawings should be submitted on the relevant sheet size. A0 & B series are acceptable depending on type and size of development.

Recommended sizes and scales are:

  • Sheet Size

Design Response and Detailed Landscaping Plans

Site Analysis and Design Response (depending on type and size of development)

A1

A3

Minor works and construction details

Specifications and construction details

A3

A4

  • Scale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Site Analysis/Design Response

 

Master Plans

 

Detailed Landscaping Plans Construction Details

 

 

 

1:1000

 

1:250

 

1:100/1:200/1:500

 

1:10/1:20/1:50

 

 

3.3 Dimensioning

  • Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres
  • Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m
  • Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format.

3.4 General Requirements for all Landscape Plans

The following works detailed below should be included on the relevant landscape plans submitted to Council:

3.4.1 Landscaped Areas

The “landscaped area” is defined as the part/s of the site not occupied by buildings, car parking spaces, driveways, manoeuvring or street garbage collection areas. It includes planter areas, internal courtyards, water features and recreational uses.

All areas set aside for landscaping should be clearly shown on the plans.

3.4.2 Plant Selection

The plant species selected should be suited to the environmental and climatic conditions of the region. In order to promote a sustainable landscape, consideration should be given to the inclusion of indigenous species, and should be selected in response to proposed site irrigation, current water restrictions and long term maintenance requirements. Refer to the Indigenous Plant Zones on Casey’s website to locate the relevant Indigenous Plant Guide for your site.

Appropriate species should be chosen to suit their intended use, eg. position, water requirements, soil types, mature size, and any detrimental characteristics. Casey encourages use of species of varying heights e.g. groundcovers, shrubs and trees. Tree planting (or landscape buffers) are generally not permitted within easements.

3.4.3 Planting Density

Planting should be undertaken in sufficient densities to achieve a desirable visual effect. Council recommends that planting occurs at a density to ensure 85% coverage at 12 months from planting date.

3.4.4 Soil Preparation

Although soil requirements vary according to specific vegetation needs, to ensure the vegetation planted has every chance of surviving beyond the first year, the following is recommended as a minimum for soil and garden bed preparation:

  • In-ground garden bed areas shall have:
100mm cultivated sub-grade
200mm prepared garden soil
75mm biodegradable/inorganic mulch
  • Turf shall have:
75mm topsoil

3.4.5 Garden Bed Edging

Where garden beds adjoin:

  • Car parking areas - there is a tendency for plants to be damaged, or even destroyed, by encroaching wheels. To protect the plants an edge restraint should be installed. For minimum protection this should be a 150mm height fixed durable edge eg. pavers, concrete or treated timber.
  • Pedestrian pavements - no formal treatment is required.
  • Lawn areas - a hard edge is recommended.
  • Timber or Steel edge – for subdivisions in public open space where beds adjoin lawn areas.

3.4.6 Paving

In order to provide a well planned, useable and low maintenance landscape, it is advisable to install paving in the following locations, where applicable:

  • From parking areas to the principal entries of all buildings/dwellings.
  • Common property/recreation areas.
  • Refuse bin enclosure and letter boxes.
  • Drying areas.
  • Rear courtyards of each dwelling, when access to the courtyards is only via the dwelling.

Minimum site permeability requirements as detailed in the planning scheme must be met for all developments.

Paving should be in the form of either concrete, asphalt surfacing or concrete/clay unit pavers in most locations. Loose gravel, decomposed granite or stepping stones will not be acceptable on shared pedestrian access routes due to their high maintenance requirements, although they may be used elsewhere, such as on sites of heritage or other identified character significance.

The use of a permeable pavement is encouraged in design to allow water to permeate the subsoil. This type of treatment is preferred in areas which have limited foot and vehicle traffic. It is also desirable for paving surfaces to direct runoff towards areas of high infiltration such as garden beds, rather than hard surfaces.

To allow two people to walk abreast, pathways should be a minimum width as per Casey standard drawings. For pedestrian safety, paths should be separated from car circulation and parking areas by kerbs, bollards or a garden bed.

To maximise visual appeal, areas adjoining paths should be landscaped with shade trees.

Car park requirements must be in accordance with Australian Standards and the Casey Planning Scheme and should be designed to be free draining, allowing clear and safe pedestrian movement without garden beds being damaged and landscaped to improve their visual amenity and provide sun protection for parked cars.

To achieve these aims, the following minimum requirements should be considered:

  • Landscaped areas should be maximised, therefore car parking should not be provided within the landscaped setback along the street frontage.
  • Where cutouts for tree planting are provided within car park areas, there should be a minimum 1m planting area at ground level.
  • A long lasting durable surface, such as bitumen, concrete or pavers should be provided throughout the car park.
  • Car parks should be free draining, preferably directing runoff to areas of high infiltration, rather than kerb and channel, etc.
  • A minimum of one canopy tree for every four linear car parking spaces with understorey planting to garden beds.
  • The immediate area around car parking bays should be landscaped to reduce the harshness of the broad areas of sealed surface. This should include trees which provide shade and garden beds planted with shrubs that are in character with other landscaped areas of the development.
  • All landscaped areas should be separated from vehicular areas by means of a kerb, small wall or other effective physical barrier.
  • To avoid damage to plants from exhausts or vehicle overhang, a minimum planting offset of 600mm is required from back of kerb. Plantings may also be protected using kerbs, bollards, barriers, guards or wheel stops.

Where more than 3 rows of car parking occur, the expanse of the car park should be broken up by installing a landscaped traffic island between the two abutting rows. A minimum internal dimension between back of kerb of 1.8m will provide space for shade trees to grow. The traffic island should be planted with appropriate trees, shrubs and ground covers, to allow for visibility through the car park.

Car parks need to be designed with regard to the most up-to-date Water Sensitive Urban Design principles.

Car parking layout should also address traffic engineering requirements and take account of:

  • Access from internal road network
  • Garbage access and turnaround
  • Pedestrian access and connection
  • Clearance from parking bays
  • Lighting
  • CCTV, and
  • Traffic interaction with canopy trees.

3.4.8 Driveways

Driveways must be designed in accordance with the requirements of the Casey Planning Scheme and Casey standard drawings, but consideration should also be given to:

Avoiding long, straight visually unappealing driveways.

 

  • Provision of privacy screening between driveways and buildings to reduce headlight glare where appropriate.
  • Setting driveways back from side boundaries a minimum width of 600mm to allow effective planting to reduce the visual impact, soften the hard outline and offer privacy for users. Trees should be included wherever possible at intervals suitable for the selected species.
  • Splays in the landscape along the driveway to provide areas for appropriate canopy tree planting to provide shade over these potentially hot areas.
  • Crossovers into future reserves are required to be installed at subdivision stage.

3.4.9 Drainage

In order to re-charge the natural water table and replenish groundwater removed by evaporation and the use of bores, it is desirable for surface runoff to be directed towards areas of high infiltration, such as garden beds. However, where ponding may interfere with pedestrian access, or threaten flooding of buildings, runoff should be diverted into grated pits and discharged into kerbs, channels, appropriate conduits, or drainage easements as applicable to Council’s requirements. Water Sensitive Urban Design principles such as the collection and retention of stormwater for re-use on site, or redirection into rain gardens should be incorporated into designs wherever possible.

3.4.10 Irrigation/Watering

The installation of an irrigation system on private land is not mandatory, however the use of rain water harvesting devices such as water tanks, is encouraged. The design of all watering systems must ensure an efficient and economical application of water, in accordance with Sustainable Watering Practices for Council Maintained Parks, Gardens and Reserves Policy. If irrigation is not being proposed, planting must be sustainable. Council has a detailed watering policy covering use of types of water, and compliance with water restrictions. This can be accessed at www.casey.vic.gov.au/policiesstrategies

3.4.11 Erosion Control Methods

Erosion prevention and the treatment of banks and slopes which have a gradient of 1:4 or steeper is to include methods which will achieve the following:

  • The control/prevention of water flow over the top of the slopes eg. via redirection of water flow using a drainage swale,
  • The stabilisation and revegetation of the slope face eg. via hydro mulching, stabilisation matting, turf etc; and
  • The use of terracing or retaining walls.

3.4.12 Sustainability

The City of Casey is committed to creating environmentally sustainable, innovative landscapes. All landscape designs must incorporate sustainable landscape principles. Low water use planting design, onsite treatment of stormwater runoff, rain water harvesting, use of materials that are sourced from sustainable supplies, and recharging of ground water through the use of permeable pavements are some of the ideals that should be integral to all landscape designs.

A sustainable landscape will:

  • Consider local environmental conditions;
  • Contain water wise plant selection;
  • Use water conservation methods such as mulch;
  • Provide habitat for local native fauna;
  • Avoid the use of pesticides and herbicides;
  • Consume minimal non-renewable energy in construction and maintenance; and
  • Use locally sourced sustainable materials and products.

3.4.13 Sustainability

The City of Casey is committed to creating environmentally sustainable, innovative landscapes. All landscape designs must incorporate sustainable landscape principles. Low water use planting design, onsite treatment of stormwater runoff, rain water harvesting, use of materials that are sourced from sustainable supplies, and recharging of ground water through the use of permeable pavements are some of the ideals that should be integral to all landscape designs.

A sustainable landscape will:

  • Consider local environmental conditions;
  • Contain water wise plant selection;
  • Use water conservation methods such as mulch;
  • Provide habitat for local native fauna;
  • Avoid the use of pesticides and herbicides;
  • Consume minimal non-renewable energy in construction and maintenance; and
  • Use locally sourced sustainable materials and products.

3.4.14 Existing Tree Retention/Removal

Existing trees to be retained shall be protected in accordance with the Casey Tree Manual. The retention of existing trees will preserve established landscape character and may also serve to allay public objection to the proposals. Existing trees over 100mm trunk diameter at base should not be removed from development sites without written Council approval. Tree protection of existing trees must be addressed at subdivision stage for the long term protection and ongoing health, and temporary protection must be provided during development works.

If an existing tree is significantly damaged by the building works, the owner / developer will be required to install a replacement tree of similar size and aesthetic value. Replacing a mature tree can be costly, so it is advisable to take every precaution in the prevention of potential damage. The Native Vegetation Framework’s three step approach of avoid, minimise and offset must be adhered to during any development.

3.5 Landscape Maintenance

To protect and ensure the ongoing investment in a quality landscape, a maintenance regime is highly recommended for all developments and is mandatory for subdivisions. There tends to be a myth that native plants don’t require maintenance, and although they do tend to require less maintenance than their exotic counterparts, there are still some basic requirements that should be followed as described below:

  • Position – Check with your local nursery as to the best location and soil types for the species of plant you have selected. Group together plants that need similar conditions.
  • Fertiliser – Most natives grow well without extra fertiliser and in fact high phosphate fertilisers may be harmful to many. All fertilisers should be used as per manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Water – most natives require minimal water however in the establishment stage it is recommended to water at least weekly until the plant establishes. Once established, over watering can be more harmful to the plant than under watering.
  • Mulch – Use mulches and groundcover plants, they help reduce weed growth and keep the soil cool, moist and friable.
  • Pruning – Lightly prune immediately after flowering. Light pruning promotes compact growth and more flowers. Heavy pruning may kill some plants which reshoot poorly from old wood.
  • Grass – Reduce grass areas where possible, but if they are still required;
    • use sustainable, warm climate, drought tolerant or indigenous grasses; and
    • establish as quickly as possible to avoid erosion and sedimentation to the local waterways and prevent the establishment of weeds.
  • Trees and shrubs – plant within mulched garden beds rather than numerous small trees planted individually throughout the grassed area.
  • Single shade trees – Mulched to 75mm depth in a minimum 2m diameter circle, to avoid damage to trunks by mowers or whipper snippers.

 

3 General Requirements For All Landscape Plans

3.1 Plan Quality

  • Drawing line work must be legible and able to be photocopied in black and white.
  • Text must be easily read whether hand written, typed or stencilled.

3.2 Sheet Size and Scale

Sheet Sizes and Scales are indicative only. These may vary depending on the size and scope of individual projects. Scale drawings should be submitted on the relevant sheet size. A0 & B series are acceptable depending on type and size of development.

Recommended sizes and scales are:

  • Sheet Size

Design Response and Detailed Landscaping Plans

Site Analysis and Design Response (depending on type and size of development)

A1

A3

Minor works and construction details

Specifications and construction details

A3

A4

  • Scale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Site Analysis/Design Response

 

Master Plans

 

Detailed Landscaping Plans Construction Details

 

 

 

1:1000

 

1:250

 

1:100/1:200/1:500

 

1:10/1:20/1:50

 

 

3.3 Dimensioning

  • Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres
  • Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m
  • Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format.

3.4 General Requirements for all Landscape Plans

The following works detailed below should be included on the relevant landscape plans submitted to Council:

3.4.1 Landscaped Areas

The “landscaped area” is defined as the part/s of the site not occupied by buildings, car parking spaces, driveways, manoeuvring or street garbage collection areas. It includes planter areas, internal courtyards, water features and recreational uses.

All areas set aside for landscaping should be clearly shown on the plans.

3.4.2 Plant Selection

The plant species selected should be suited to the environmental and climatic conditions of the region. In order to promote a sustainable landscape, consideration should be given to the inclusion of indigenous species, and should be selected in response to proposed site irrigation, current water restrictions and long term maintenance requirements. Refer to the Indigenous Plant Zones on Casey’s website to locate the relevant Indigenous Plant Guide for your site.

Appropriate species should be chosen to suit their intended use, eg. position, water requirements, soil types, mature size, and any detrimental characteristics. Casey encourages use of species of varying heights e.g. groundcovers, shrubs and trees. Tree planting (or landscape buffers) are generally not permitted within easements.

3.4.3 Planting Density

Planting should be undertaken in sufficient densities to achieve a desirable visual effect. Council recommends that planting occurs at a density to ensure 85% coverage at 12 months from planting date.

3.4.4 Soil Preparation

Although soil requirements vary according to specific vegetation needs, to ensure the vegetation planted has every chance of surviving beyond the first year, the following is recommended as a minimum for soil and garden bed preparation:

  • In-ground garden bed areas shall have:
100mm cultivated sub-grade
200mm prepared garden soil
75mm biodegradable/inorganic mulch
  • Turf shall have:
75mm topsoil

3.4.5 Garden Bed Edging

Where garden beds adjoin:

  • Car parking areas - there is a tendency for plants to be damaged, or even destroyed, by encroaching wheels. To protect the plants an edge restraint should be installed. For minimum protection this should be a 150mm height fixed durable edge eg. pavers, concrete or treated timber.
  • Pedestrian pavements - no formal treatment is required.
  • Lawn areas - a hard edge is recommended.
  • Timber or Steel edge – for subdivisions in public open space where beds adjoin lawn areas.

3.4.6 Paving

In order to provide a well planned, useable and low maintenance landscape, it is advisable to install paving in the following locations, where applicable:

  • From parking areas to the principal entries of all buildings/dwellings.
  • Common property/recreation areas.
  • Refuse bin enclosure and letter boxes.
  • Drying areas.
  • Rear courtyards of each dwelling, when access to the courtyards is only via the dwelling.

Minimum site permeability requirements as detailed in the planning scheme must be met for all developments.

Paving should be in the form of either concrete, asphalt surfacing or concrete/clay unit pavers in most locations. Loose gravel, decomposed granite or stepping stones will not be acceptable on shared pedestrian access routes due to their high maintenance requirements, although they may be used elsewhere, such as on sites of heritage or other identified character significance.

The use of a permeable pavement is encouraged in design to allow water to permeate the subsoil. This type of treatment is preferred in areas which have limited foot and vehicle traffic. It is also desirable for paving surfaces to direct runoff towards areas of high infiltration such as garden beds, rather than hard surfaces.

To allow two people to walk abreast, pathways should be a minimum width as per Casey standard drawings. For pedestrian safety, paths should be separated from car circulation and parking areas by kerbs, bollards or a garden bed.

To maximise visual appeal, areas adjoining paths should be landscaped with shade trees.

Car park requirements must be in accordance with Australian Standards and the Casey Planning Scheme and should be designed to be free draining, allowing clear and safe pedestrian movement without garden beds being damaged and landscaped to improve their visual amenity and provide sun protection for parked cars.

To achieve these aims, the following minimum requirements should be considered:

  • Landscaped areas should be maximised, therefore car parking should not be provided within the landscaped setback along the street frontage.
  • Where cutouts for tree planting are provided within car park areas, there should be a minimum 1m planting area at ground level.
  • A long lasting durable surface, such as bitumen, concrete or pavers should be provided throughout the car park.
  • Car parks should be free draining, preferably directing runoff to areas of high infiltration, rather than kerb and channel, etc.
  • A minimum of one canopy tree for every four linear car parking spaces with understorey planting to garden beds.
  • The immediate area around car parking bays should be landscaped to reduce the harshness of the broad areas of sealed surface. This should include trees which provide shade and garden beds planted with shrubs that are in character with other landscaped areas of the development.
  • All landscaped areas should be separated from vehicular areas by means of a kerb, small wall or other effective physical barrier.
  • To avoid damage to plants from exhausts or vehicle overhang, a minimum planting offset of 600mm is required from back of kerb. Plantings may also be protected using kerbs, bollards, barriers, guards or wheel stops.

Where more than 3 rows of car parking occur, the expanse of the car park should be broken up by installing a landscaped traffic island between the two abutting rows. A minimum internal dimension between back of kerb of 1.8m will provide space for shade trees to grow. The traffic island should be planted with appropriate trees, shrubs and ground covers, to allow for visibility through the car park.

Car parks need to be designed with regard to the most up-to-date Water Sensitive Urban Design principles.

Car parking layout should also address traffic engineering requirements and take account of:

  • Access from internal road network
  • Garbage access and turnaround
  • Pedestrian access and connection
  • Clearance from parking bays
  • Lighting
  • CCTV, and
  • Traffic interaction with canopy trees.

3.4.8 Driveways

Driveways must be designed in accordance with the requirements of the Casey Planning Scheme and Casey standard drawings, but consideration should also be given to:

Avoiding long, straight visually unappealing driveways.

 

  • Provision of privacy screening between driveways and buildings to reduce headlight glare where appropriate.
  • Setting driveways back from side boundaries a minimum width of 600mm to allow effective planting to reduce the visual impact, soften the hard outline and offer privacy for users. Trees should be included wherever possible at intervals suitable for the selected species.
  • Splays in the landscape along the driveway to provide areas for appropriate canopy tree planting to provide shade over these potentially hot areas.
  • Crossovers into future reserves are required to be installed at subdivision stage.

3.4.9 Drainage

In order to re-charge the natural water table and replenish groundwater removed by evaporation and the use of bores, it is desirable for surface runoff to be directed towards areas of high infiltration, such as garden beds. However, where ponding may interfere with pedestrian access, or threaten flooding of buildings, runoff should be diverted into grated pits and discharged into kerbs, channels, appropriate conduits, or drainage easements as applicable to Council’s requirements. Water Sensitive Urban Design principles such as the collection and retention of stormwater for re-use on site, or redirection into rain gardens should be incorporated into designs wherever possible.

3.4.10 Irrigation/Watering

The installation of an irrigation system on private land is not mandatory, however the use of rain water harvesting devices such as water tanks, is encouraged. The design of all watering systems must ensure an efficient and economical application of water, in accordance with Sustainable Watering Practices for Council Maintained Parks, Gardens and Reserves Policy. If irrigation is not being proposed, planting must be sustainable. Council has a detailed watering policy covering use of types of water, and compliance with water restrictions. This can be accessed at www.casey.vic.gov.au/policiesstrategies

3.4.11 Erosion Control Methods

Erosion prevention and the treatment of banks and slopes which have a gradient of 1:4 or steeper is to include methods which will achieve the following:

  • The control/prevention of water flow over the top of the slopes eg. via redirection of water flow using a drainage swale,
  • The stabilisation and revegetation of the slope face eg. via hydro mulching, stabilisation matting, turf etc; and
  • The use of terracing or retaining walls.

3.4.12 Sustainability

The City of Casey is committed to creating environmentally sustainable, innovative landscapes. All landscape designs must incorporate sustainable landscape principles. Low water use planting design, onsite treatment of stormwater runoff, rain water harvesting, use of materials that are sourced from sustainable supplies, and recharging of ground water through the use of permeable pavements are some of the ideals that should be integral to all landscape designs.

A sustainable landscape will:

  • Consider local environmental conditions;
  • Contain water wise plant selection;
  • Use water conservation methods such as mulch;
  • Provide habitat for local native fauna;
  • Avoid the use of pesticides and herbicides;
  • Consume minimal non-renewable energy in construction and maintenance; and
  • Use locally sourced sustainable materials and products.

3.4.13 Sustainability

The City of Casey is committed to creating environmentally sustainable, innovative landscapes. All landscape designs must incorporate sustainable landscape principles. Low water use planting design, onsite treatment of stormwater runoff, rain water harvesting, use of materials that are sourced from sustainable supplies, and recharging of ground water through the use of permeable pavements are some of the ideals that should be integral to all landscape designs.

A sustainable landscape will:

  • Consider local environmental conditions;
  • Contain water wise plant selection;
  • Use water conservation methods such as mulch;
  • Provide habitat for local native fauna;
  • Avoid the use of pesticides and herbicides;
  • Consume minimal non-renewable energy in construction and maintenance; and
  • Use locally sourced sustainable materials and products.

3.4.14 Existing Tree Retention/Removal

Existing trees to be retained shall be protected in accordance with the Casey Tree Manual. The retention of existing trees will preserve established landscape character and may also serve to allay public objection to the proposals. Existing trees over 100mm trunk diameter at base should not be removed from development sites without written Council approval. Tree protection of existing trees must be addressed at subdivision stage for the long term protection and ongoing health, and temporary protection must be provided during development works.

If an existing tree is significantly damaged by the building works, the owner / developer will be required to install a replacement tree of similar size and aesthetic value. Replacing a mature tree can be costly, so it is advisable to take every precaution in the prevention of potential damage. The Native Vegetation Framework’s three step approach of avoid, minimise and offset must be adhered to during any development.

3.5 Landscape Maintenance

To protect and ensure the ongoing investment in a quality landscape, a maintenance regime is highly recommended for all developments and is mandatory for subdivisions. There tends to be a myth that native plants don’t require maintenance, and although they do tend to require less maintenance than their exotic counterparts, there are still some basic requirements that should be followed as described below:

  • Position – Check with your local nursery as to the best location and soil types for the species of plant you have selected. Group together plants that need similar conditions.
  • Fertiliser – Most natives grow well without extra fertiliser and in fact high phosphate fertilisers may be harmful to many. All fertilisers should be used as per manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Water – most natives require minimal water however in the establishment stage it is recommended to water at least weekly until the plant establishes. Once established, over watering can be more harmful to the plant than under watering.
  • Mulch – Use mulches and groundcover plants, they help reduce weed growth and keep the soil cool, moist and friable.
  • Pruning – Lightly prune immediately after flowering. Light pruning promotes compact growth and more flowers. Heavy pruning may kill some plants which reshoot poorly from old wood.
  • Grass – Reduce grass areas where possible, but if they are still required;
    • use sustainable, warm climate, drought tolerant or indigenous grasses; and
    • establish as quickly as possible to avoid erosion and sedimentation to the local waterways and prevent the establishment of weeds.
  • Trees and shrubs – plant within mulched garden beds rather than numerous small trees planted individually throughout the grassed area.
  • Single shade trees – Mulched to 75mm depth in a minimum 2m diameter circle, to avoid damage to trunks by mowers or whipper snippers.

Specific Design Requirements for Residential Landscapes

This section applies to all residential proposals including single dwellings, dual occupancies and multi unit residential developments where a landscape plan is required to be submitted as part of the planning approval.

Where additional dwellings are proposed on a lot with an existing dwelling, a consistent landscape scheme is required for the whole site which may mean the upgrading of existing landscaping to match in with the new proposed works.

In addition to the requirements outlined in section 3 of this policy, outlined below are the minimum design standards for the landscaping of residential development on private property.

4.1 Space Definition

Every dwelling’s private open space should be screened from view from adjacent dwellings, common areas and access ways using trees and shrubs to provide privacy and shade when mature.

Common areas within multi unit residential developments also need to be landscaped appropriately. These areas must be separated from adjacent dwellings and access ways by landscaping comprising trees, shrubs and/or lawns.

4.2 Adjoining Properties

Prior to determining the site layout, it is advisable that the designer examine and respond to adjacent properties particularly where the site adjoins:

  • Parkland or a reserve:
  • to configure and design the buildings to capitalise on the views, by installing windows, transparent fencing into the parkland, or reducing fence height. This will enable passive surveillance onto the parklands and;
  • to plant canopy trees along the boundaries to enhance the site’s amenity.
  • Bushland:
  • to encourage wildlife onto the development site by installing compatible native flora
  • consider the use of permeable fences to allow fauna movement between properties and open space
  • Existing or proposed bike/pedestrian paths:
  • to encourage direct access.

4.3 Landscape Buffer/Screen Planting

A major function of landscaping is to provide a buffer or visual screen between adjoining properties and ensure privacy between on-site uses i.e. between dwellings on the same site.

To create an effective visual barrier, screen planting should be established along all side and rear boundaries where possible and incorporated into mass planted, tiered (i.e. using

 

trees, shrubs and groundcovers) garden beds. The installation of a 1.8m high screen fence without landscape planting will not be sufficient.

Where a development is proposed that has a visual impact upon the landscape, vegetative screen buffering is required to remedy the situation. Situations may include car parks, large sheds, industrial sites, acoustic fencing etc. The need for fast spreading, low maintenance species is recommended with large bands of single species for continuity.

Screen planting is also required around refuse bin enclosures. The minimum width of a garden bed should be as follows:

 

Building > 3.0m from the property boundary

1500mm

 

Building between 1.5 - 3.0m from the property boundary

1000mm

 

Building < 1.5m from the property boundary

600mm

Due consideration should be given to the use of appropriate species when planting within easements.

Submission Checklist ~ Residential

Please use the checklist below to assist you in the preparation of your landscape plans. Detailed information for each item can be found in Section 2, 3 and 4 of this document.

General Documentation Standards (Section 2 & 3)

Plan Quality

Line work legible, able to be photocopied in black and white

 

Text easily read

 

Shading with line work or ‘Letraset’ type patterns and tonings

 

Sheet Size

Detailed Plan Sheet Size A1 or A3

 

Minor works and construction details A3 (If required)

 

Plan Scale 1:100, 1:200 or 1:500

 

Construction details (If required) Scale 1:10 or 1:20

 

Dimensions

Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres

 

Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m

 

Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format

 

Site Analysis Includes

Surrounding environment considered

 

Survey of existing vegetation (Arborist report) undertaken

 

Vegetation on adjoining properties protected

 

Detailed Landscape Plan Includes

A site survey

 

Detailed Planting Plan

 

Detailed Plant Schedule

 

Details of Paths and Driveways

 

Location of outdoor structures

 

Location and detail of garden edges

 

Details of hard landscape elements

 

Proposed drainage and irrigation

 

Location and detail of all existing and proposed easements

 

Specific Design Requirements (Section 4)

Space Definition Includes

 

Dwellings screened from adjacent dwellings

 

Common areas landscaped appropriately

 

Common areas planted with trees, shrubs and/or lawns

 

Adjoining Properties Includes

Design responds to adjacent properties

 

Where adjacent to a park or reserve canopy tree planting along boundaries

 

Native flora used to encourage wildlife

 

Pedestrian / bike access been considered and resolved

 

Landscape Buffer / Screen Planting Includes

Screen planting proposed along all side and rear boundaries

 

Minimum garden bed widths adhered to

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refer also the following:

 

 

 

City of Casey Landscape Policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relevant Indigenous Plant Zone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of Casey Weed list

 

 

 

 

 

 Specific Design Requirements for Industrial Developments

Industrial developments include factories, warehouses, storage and transport facilities. All industrial developments must be appropriately landscaped. In addition to the requirements outlined in section 3 of this policy, Industrial developments must also address the additional requirements outlined below. Industrial Subdivisions also need to refer to the requirements outlined in sections 8 and 9.

5.1 Space Definition

The landscape areas within an industrial development can be defined as a series of spaces for specific uses.

In industrial developments the provision of a shaded, outdoor seating area for use by staff during breaks should be considered and incorporated within the landscaping plan.

5.2 Landscape Buffer/Screen Planting

A 5.0m minimum landscape buffer is required between any development, including car parking and all street frontages.

All species should be selected with consideration given to building volumes, heights and scale, and should balance the visual impact of the development with the surrounding environment. Where a development is proposed that has a visual impact upon the landscape, vegetative screen buffering is required to remedy the situation. Situations may include car parks, large sheds, industrial sites, acoustic fencing etc . The need for fast spreading, low maintenance species is recommended with large bands of single species for continuity.

5.3 Street Frontage Landscaping

At least 35% of the frontage setback should be mass planted with mulched garden beds to visually enhance the view of the property from the road. This setback planting should incorporate a minimum of one tree, plus additional trees provided at the rate of one tree for every eight lineal metres of street frontage (minimum requirement). However, it is not a requirement to plant in a lineal manner.

Setbacks from the frontage must comply with the Casey Planning Scheme and setbacks from infrastructure and services shall be in accordance with the Casey Tree Manual.

Submission Checklist ~ Industrial Developments

Please use the checklist below to assist you in the preparation of your landscape plans. Detailed information can be found in Section 2, 3 and 5 of this document.

General documentation Standards (Section 2 & 3)

Plan Quality

Line work legible, able to be photocopied in black and white

 

Text easily read

 

Shading with line work or ‘Letraset’ type patterns and tonings

 

Sheet Size

Detailed Plan Sheet Size A1 or A3

 

Minor works and construction details A3 (If required)

 

Plan Scale 1:100, 1:200 or 1:500

 

Construction details (If required) Scale 1:10 or 1:20

 

Dimensions

Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres

 

Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m

 

Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format

 

Site Analysis Includes

Surrounding environment considered

 

Survey of existing vegetation (Arborist report) undertaken

 

Vegetation on adjoining properties protected

 

Master Plan Includes

Existing site information

 

All proposed site elements

 

Indication of areas to be landscaped

 

Indication of planting philosophy

 

Detailed Landscape Plan Includes

A site survey

 

Detailed Planting Plan

 

Detailed Plant Schedule

 

Details of Paths and Driveways

 

Location of outdoor structures

 

Location and detail of garden edges

 

Details of hard landscape elements

 

Proposed drainage and irrigation

 

Location and detail of all existing and proposed easements

 

Specific Design Requirements (Section 5)

Space Definition Includes

 

Shaded outdoor areas considered

 

Spaces defined as per their use

 

Landscape Buffer / Screen Planting Includes

A minimum 5m landscape buffer along all street frontages

 

Plant species selected with intent to create a balanced visual impact

 

Street Frontage Includes

Minimum 35% mass planted mulched garden bed

 

Minimum one tree per eight lineal metres

 

Refer also to the following:

City of Casey Landscape Policy

¨

Relevant Indigenous Plant Zone

¨

City of Casey Weed list

¨

Specific Design Requirements for Commerical Developments

Commercial developments include offices, retail businesses, child care centres and medical centres. In addition to the requirements outlined in section 3 of this policy the minimum design standards required for the landscaping of commercial developments are as follows:

6.1 Plant Selection

The selection of plant species for all commercial developments, particularly within publicly accessible areas, needs to be carefully considered to ensure the suitability of species for the location, the on-going maintenance needs and any potential detrimental elements they may have.

Two examples include:

  • Child care centres - Plant selection must exclude plants with traces of toxicity; plants which produce hard seeds/fruit that can be swallowed; and plants with spines, abrasive trunks or foliage. Plants which are known to cause asthma and allergic reactions must also be avoided.
  • Crime prevention - Careful plant selection can play a part in reducing the potential risk of crime. Areas directly adjacent to showrooms, windows, doors and car parks can pose a security risk. Planting beds in these locations should be designed to deter loitering by using trees with clean stemmed trunks planted in association with shrubs and ground covers not exceeding 1.0m in height.

6.2 Landscape Buffer

For medical centres, display homes and child care centres a minimum landscape buffer width of 2.0m is required where car parking areas abut residential properties, and along street frontages. Other landscape buffers may be specified in development plans, structure plans or other Council policies. Where a development is proposed that has a visual impact upon the landscape, vegetative screen buffering is required to remedy the situation. Situations may include car parks, large sheds, industrial sites, acoustic fencing etc. The need for fast spreading, low maintenance species is recommended with large bands of single species for continuity.

6.3 Maintenance Agreements

Maintenance agreements will be required where Developers are proposing works on existing and future Council land.

Submission Checklist ~ Commercial Developments

Please use the checklist below to assist you in the preparation of your landscape plans. Detailed information can be found in Section 2, 3 and 6 of this document.

General Documentation Standards (Section 2)

Plan Quality

Line work legible, able to be photocopied in black and white

 

Text easily read

 

Shading with line work or ‘Letraset’ type patterns and tonings

 

Sheet Size

Detailed Plan Sheet Size A1 or A3

 

Minor works and construction details A3 (If required)

 

Plan Scale 1:100, 1:200 or 1:500

 

Construction details (If required) Scale 1:10 or 1:20

 

Dimensions

Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres

 

Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m

 

Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format

 

Site Analysis Includes

Surrounding environment considered

 

Survey of existing vegetation (Arborist report) undertaken

 

Vegetation on adjoining properties protected

 

Master Plan Includes

Existing site information

 

All proposed site elements

 

Indication of areas to be landscaped

 

Indication of planting philosophy

 

Detailed Landscape Plan Includes

A site survey

 

Detailed Planting Plan

 

Detailed Plant Schedule

 

Details of Paths and Driveways

 

Location of outdoor structures

 

Location and detail of garden edges

 

Details of hard landscape elements

 

Proposed drainage and irrigation

 

Location and detail of all existing and proposed easements

 

Specific Design Requirements (Section 6)

Plant Selection Includes

 

Plants selected suitable for type of development

 

Crime prevention principals utilised

 

Landscape Buffer / Screen Planting Includes

A 2m minimum landscape buffer

 

Plant species selected with intent to create a balanced visual impact

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refer also to the following:

 

 

 

City of Casey Landscape Policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relevant Indigenous Plant Zone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of Casey Weed list

 

 

 

 

 

Specific Design Requirements for Community Developments

Community developments include all Council owned and operated buildings. In addition to the requirements outlined in section 3 of this policy, the minimum design standards required for the landscaping of community developments are as follows:

7.1 Design Intent

All Community buildings require landscaping that will allow for the best use of the facility, ease of maintenance and quality finishes.

Two examples include:

  • Kindergarten play areas - should be designed to maximise the learning and play experience of those children who will attend them. The use of sustainable natural materials are preferred for these environments
  • Sporting Pavilions – Landscaping surrounding pavilions needs to address issues such as access, spectator areas, shade/shelter, view lines and soft landscaping. The use of sustainable easily maintainable materials is preferred for these environments.

7.2 Plant Selection

The selection of plant species for all community developments, particularly within publicly accessible areas, needs to be carefully considered to ensure the suitability of species for the location, the on-going maintenance needs and any potential detrimental elements they may have.

For example:

Plant selection for Kindergartens must exclude plants with traces of toxicity; plants which produce hard seeds/fruit that can be swallowed; and plants with spines, abrasive trunks or foliage. Plants which are known to cause asthma and allergic reactions must also be avoided.

7.3 Landscape Buffer

For all Community buildings a minimum landscape buffer width of 3.0m is required where car parking areas abut residential properties, and along street frontages. Other landscape buffers may be specified in development plans, structure plans or other Council policies. Where a development is proposed that has a visual impact upon the landscape, vegetative screen buffering is required to remedy the situation. Situations may include car parks, large sheds, industrial sites, acoustic fencing etc. The

need for fast spreading, low maintenance species is recommended with large bands of single species for continuity.

7.4 Funding

To achieve Casey’s landscape vision, appropriate landscape plans must be prepared for any Council building. As part of the scoping of the project for funding purposes, costs for landscaping must be included as part of the overall project budget.

Allocation of these funds will ensure that all developments will contribute to a positive and sustainable landscape image throughout the City of Casey.

Submission Checklist ~ Community Developments

Please use the checklist below to assist you in the preparation of your landscape plans. Detailed information can be found in Section 2, 3 and 7 of this document.

General Documentation Standards (Section 2)

Plan Quality

Line work legible, able to be photocopied in black and white

 

Text easily read

 

Shading with line work or ‘Letraset’ type patterns and tonings

 

Sheet Size

Detailed Plan Sheet Size A1 or A3

 

Minor works and construction details A3 (If required)

 

Plan Scale 1:100, 1:200 or 1:500

 

Construction details (If required) Scale 1:10 or 1:20

 

Dimensions

Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres

 

Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m

 

Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format

 

Site Analysis Includes

Surrounding environment considered

 

Survey of existing vegetation (Arborist report) undertaken

 

Vegetation on adjoining properties protected

 

Detailed Landscape Plan Includes

A site survey

 

Detailed Planting Plan

 

Detailed Plant Schedule

 

Details of Paths and Driveways

 

Location of outdoor structures

 

Location and detail of garden edges

 

Details of hard landscape elements

 

Proposed drainage and irrigation

 

Location and detail of all existing and proposed easements

 

Specific Design Requirements (Section 7)

Design Intent Includes

 

Landscaped areas which enhance the use of the building

 

lant Selection Includes

 

Plants selected suitable for type of development

 

Crime prevention principals utilised

 

Landscape Buffer / Screen Planting Includes

A 3m minimum landscape buffer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refer also to the following:

 

 

 

City of Casey Landscape Policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relevant Indigenous Plant Zone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of Casey Weed list

Specific Design Requirements for Subdivision Developments

In addition to the requirements outlined in section 3 of this policy, Subdivision developments must also address the additional requirements outlined below. Plans submitted must be in accordance with any relevant development plan. As part of subdivision works, a landscape bond will be required see Figure 2.

8.1 Layout

The site and road layout of a proposed subdivision should not be the sole responsibility of the consultant engineer or land surveyor. By involving landscape architects and planners in the initial site layout, it may be possible to produce an environmentally sensitive design which incorporates the site’s natural elements to their best advantage.

8.2 Topography

It is not considered acceptable to terrace a site solely to maximise the number of house blocks. Road alignments should follow the shape of the terrain and not cut across skylines, nor leave large areas of exposed earth following cut and fill operations. The separation of traffic lanes should be considered if excessive cut and fill operations are required.

8.3 Views

Views are an important feature of any proposed development. Subdivision layout should maximise opportunities presented by the natural setting which may be achieved by:

  • Preserving existing views.
  • Enhancing existing views by screen planting to filter views of adjacent buildings.
  • Creating exciting views into and out of the subdivision by tree planting to frame vistas and enhance visual amenity of the locality through planting.
  • Encouraging viewing areas by establishing viewing platforms, such as, from a local promontory or wetland with interconnecting bike paths/walking trails.

8.4 Tree Reserves

All planting within Tree Reserves is to be in accordance with Casey’s streets tree strategies. Mulched areas planted with trees and understorey planting is encouraged in areas where deemed suitable by Council.

8.5 Circulation

Bike and pedestrian path width as per Casey Standard drawings should be provided within the subdivision where possible, as an extension of the proposed/existing path network. To ensure a safe, attractive environment they should be separated from vehicular traffic and provided with canopy trees at a minimum of 8.0m intervals depending on species selection as per the relevant tree strategy. Vehicular traffic should be prevented from access to these areas by the installation of an appropriate barrier.

The location of the off-road circulation network should link all community resources such as local shopping centres, parks and reserves, adjacent subdivisions and access corridors.

8.6 Construction and Maintenance

Council must be notified prior to commencement of works refer to Figure 3 for processes. Long term maintenance requirements should be carefully considered in the design of a park. The following are required to minimise maintenance:

  • Trees and shrubs - sited within mulched garden beds rather than numerous small trees planted individually throughout the grassed area.
  • Single shade trees - mulched to 75mm depth in a minimum 2m diameter circle, to avoid damage to trunks by mowers or whipper snippers.
  • Taps and drinking fountains – provided with a soak away trench at their base to avoid water logging.
  • Access for maintenance vehicles - via a lockable gate or removable bollards and a vehicle crossover.
  • Grass
    • established as quickly as possible to avoid erosion and sedimentation to the local waterways and prevent the establishment of weeds.
    • sustainable, warm climate, drought tolerant or indigenous grasses.

Consideration should be given to the timing of construction works. For example, planting is best undertaken during the cooler months.

A maintenance program is required to be submitted to Council with the submission of the landscape plans. The program should be prepared by the landscape architect/designer and should detail all proposed maintenance works for the duration of the maintenance/establishment period.

The maintenance program is directly related to landscape and plant establishment works, and should be included in the accompanying specification. Where a specification is not required, a maintenance program should be included in note form on the Detailed Landscaping Plans.

The maintenance program addressing softscape and hardscape is to include accepted horticultural practices, and codes/best practices necessary to establish the proposed landscape works in the noted maintenance period.

All landscape construction works are to be completed in accordance with endorsed plans and specifications, and a final inspection is required prior to approval of practical completion.

Council requires a minimum of a 13 week maintenance period and a 12 month defects period, for all it’s Capital Works Projects.

Subdivision works require a maintenance period of 24 months from the issue of the letter of Practical Completion. However atypical works may require longer periods as determined within the assessment process.

Figure 2

Subdivision Landscape Bonds

(Insert Figure 2 here)

Figure 3

Commencement of Works and Issue of Practical Completion

(Insert Figure 3 here)

Submission Checklist ~ Subdivision Developments

Please use the checklist below to assist you in the preparation of your landscape plans. Detailed information can be found in Section 2, 3 and 8 of this document.

 

General Documentation Standards (Section 2 & 3)

Plan Quality

Line work legible, able to be photocopied in black and white

 

Text easily read

 

Shading with line work or ‘Letraset’ type patterns and tonings

 

Sheet Size

Detailed Plan Sheet Size A1 or A3

 

Minor works and construction details A3 (If required)

 

Plan Scale 1:100, 1:200 or 1:500

 

Construction details (If required) Scale 1:10 or 1:20

 

Dimensions

Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres

 

Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m

 

Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format

 

Site Analysis Includes

Surrounding environment considered

 

Survey of existing vegetation (Arborist report) undertaken

 

Vegetation on adjoining properties protected

 

Master Plan Includes

Existing site information

 

All proposed site elements

 

Indication of areas to be landscaped

 

Indication of planting philosophy

 

Detailed Landscape Plan Includes

A site survey

 

Detailed Planting Plan

 

Detailed Plant Schedule

 

Details of Paths and Driveways

 

Location of outdoor structures

 

Location and detail of garden edges

 

Details of hard landscape elements

 

Proposed drainage and irrigation

 

Location and detail of all existing and proposed easements

 

Specific Design Requirements (Section 8)

Layout / Topography Includes

 

Site and Road layout produced with natural elements considered. Road alignments

follow shape of terrain

 

No excessive cut and fill proposed

 

Views Includes

Existing views preserved / enhanced and viewing areas encouraged

 

Tree planting used to frame vistas

 

Tree Reserves Includes

Tree species in accordance with Casey Street Tree Strategies

 

Suitable areas incorporating mulched beds with tree and understorey planting

 

Minimum one tree per eight lineal metres

 

Circulation Includes

Bike and Pedestrian paths link through the development and to adjacent developments

 

Paths separate from vehicular networks and set in an attractive environment

 

Construction - Maintenance Includes

All Maintenance requirements adhered to and a maintenance program submitted

 

Refer also to the following:

City of Casey Landscape Policy

 

Relevant Indigenous Plant Zone

 

City of Casey Weed list

Specific Design Requirements for Public Open Space Developments

Installation of play equipment

Seating

– Provide seating overlooking the playground.

9.1 Planning and Design Intent

Council’s intention is to develop a network of parks and open spaces which provide for the recreational, cultural, environmental and aesthetic needs of Casey’s residents, workers and visitors.

The value of quality parkland and open space, and the essential contribution they make to the character of the region are also recognised. Therefore, Council requires that all new open space:

  • Provides a range of recreation opportunities.
  • Balances community needs with available resources.
  • Ensures equitable access by the community.
  • Achieves the most efficient use of land resources.
  • Is developed within the financial and physical resources of the Council to maintain a quality standard.
  • Is well located, attractively designed and complies with the standards appropriate to the level and type of use of the park.
  • Is integrated within a local district and regional planning framework of parks and open space.
  • Conserves and enhances all existing significant remnant vegetation on site.

9.2 Site Selection

When selecting land for a proposed park, the following should be considered:

  • Topography - should be compatible with the proposed use eg. a gradient no steeper than 2% for playing fields.
  • Accessibility
    • Proximity to local bike paths, footpaths or local facilities are preferable to inaccessible pockets of unmaintainable hillside.
    • Should not be restricted by main roads and have safe and convenient bike and pedestrian path access.
  • Land capability – capacity to provide a range of opportunities eg. bike path access, relaxation, kick-about space, bird attracting flora.
  • Intended use
    • New parkland should complement the existing range of recreation opportunities within the local area and not duplicate them.
    • Land with the potential to protect and encourage local fauna and flora should be provided with access linkages to adjoining open space areas.
    • If the proposed park is to satisfy a nature based activity, such as bird watching, an area of remnant native habitat should be provided.

Sites likely to be considered inappropriate for active recreation reserves include land that is:

  • Used to drain or carry flood waters from the subject land unless provision is made for the creation of a natural wetland system.
  • A buffer to a transport corridor, a drainage reserve, or a hill slope.
  • Affected by hazards such as powerline easements.
  • Less than 10m wide including access links to parkland and maintenance corridors.

9.3 Park Design

Parks should be designed to satisfy the following requirements:

  • Boundary treatments
    • Provide canopy trees as an interface between a development and parklands
    • Provide barriers along road frontages to prevent vehicles entering; such as bollards or natural features (eg, existing vegetation or newly planted garden beds and staked trees)
    • Provide access or maintenance vehicles through a lockable gate or removable bollard
  • Internal circulation
    • Provide safe, unencumbered, highly visible paths
    • Link internal paths to car parks, park equipment and external networks.
  • Grassing
    • Grass should be established within the proposed park as quickly as possible to avoid erosion and sedimentation to the local waterways, and prevent the establishment of weeds. The use of sustainable, warm climate, drought tolerant or indigenous grasses is encouraged in new developments.
  • Planting
    • Utilise planting design to achieve recreational opportunities: such as group planting to provide shade adjacent to open spaces and allow unencumbered active play areas; or linear tree planting to define edges for informal 'kick-about' areas; or, othe robjectives, such as: evenly planted canopy trees to maximise sun protection, or island or corridor planting to concentrate trees for easy maintenance and encourage birdlife.
  • Mounding
    • Utilise mounds to provide topographical interest to emphasise views, help screen adjacent properties, or as part of the internal design.
    • Should not exceed a gradient of 10% (1 in 10) to reduce erosion and allow mowing.
    • Planting of trees and shrubs over the mound to further emphasise eight and shape.
    • Ensure visibility is not restricted into and out of the park.
  • Furniture
    • Should reflect the intended function of the parkland and complement any distinguishing features present, eg seating situated to maximise a view.
    • Park seating should include backrests and arms. Flat bench seats only to be used when seats with backrests and arms are in close proximity. Seating shall be provided at no less than one seat every 400m on pathways and include additional seating around playgrounds.
    • Be placed in a variety of locations, such as located under natural shade or build structures to allow for day long use, and in the open to allow for the enjoyment of winter sun. If the shade is built, it should have an impervious roof, eg Colourbond to provide shelter during rain.
    • Well drained ground and hard surfacing below any structure. Surface material should be pavers, coloured concrete or exposed aggregate.
    • Shade structures should maximise sun protection from 11.00am - 3.00pm and be constructed over a hard surface.
    • Refuse bins should be located for use requirements and easy pickup by refuse trucks, eg adjacent to playgrounds or picnic areas, at park exits
    • Natural features may be used to simulate park furniture, eg mounding for seating, trees or natural rock for bollards.
  • Public Art
    • Council encourages the use of public art within its open space
    • All public art must be in accordance with the City of Casey Public Art Policy
  • Drinking water when provided should:
    • Be located near active recreational areas, adjacent to well used paths and within an area serviceable from the road frontage.
    • Provide a soak away trench to the base of each tap to prevent ponding and waterlogging.
    • Direct water runoff is to be directed into garden beds where possible.
  • Irrigation water
    • Provide one water service connection (minimum 40mm diameter) in a lockable valve box for each 2000m2 of parkland.

9.4 Playground Design

Playground design must conform to the relevant Council Specifications and Australian Standards.

Where equipment is required by Council, the following requirements should be considered and incorporated into the design:

  • Type of play equipment
    • Selected in consultation with Council’s Landscape Services Department.
    • Should reflect the age range of users relating directly to the size, location and function of the proposed subdivision.
  • Siting of play equipment
    • Should not impinge upon adjacent residential properties; a minimum distance of 10m between equipment and park boundaries should be provided and suitably landscaped with a minimum of 3m of screen planting to and visual impact.
  • Installation of play equipment
    • Provide impact absorbing surfacing to Australian Standards under the play area, eg, continuous rubberised matting
    • Provide shade over playgrounds to encourage day long use. Proferably shade trees planted at maximum 6.0m centres around the safety area are acceptable or permanent shade structures as deemed appropriate by Council
  • Seating
    • Provide seating overlooking the playground

Submission Checklist ~ Public Open Space Developments

Please use the checklist below to assist you in the preparation of your landscape plans.. Detailed information can be found in Section 2, 3 and 9 of this document.

General Documentation Standards (Section 2 & 3)

Plan Quality

Line work legible, able to be photocopied in black and white

¨

Text easily read

¨

Shading with line work or ‘Letraset’ type patterns and tonings

¨

Sheet Size

Detailed Plan Sheet Size A1 or A3

¨

Minor works and construction details A3 (If required)

¨

Plan Scale 1:100, 1:200 or 1:500

¨

Construction details (If required) Scale 1:10 or 1:20

¨

Dimensions

Linear dimensions are to be indicated in metres or millimetres

¨

Levels are to be reduced to Australian Height Datum and indicated to 0.001m

¨

Slopes to be indicated in ratio or percentage format

¨

Site Analysis Includes

Surrounding environment considered

¨

Survey of existing vegetation (Arborist report) undertaken

¨

Vegetation on adjoining properties protected

¨

Detailed Landscape Plan Includes

A site survey

¨

Detailed Planting Plan

¨

Detailed Plant Schedule

¨

Details of Paths and Driveways

 

Location of outdoor structures

 

Location and detail of garden edges

 

Details of hard landscape elements

 

Proposed drainage and irrigation

 

Location and detail of all existing and proposed easements

 

Specific Design Requirements (Section 9 )

Design Intent Includes

 

A range of recreation opportunities

 

Equitable access

 

Efficient use of land and resources

 

Developed to a maintainable state by Council

 

Attractive design and complies with all appropriate standards

 

Integration with all planning frameworks

 

Conservation of all significant remnant vegetation on site

 

Plant Selection Includes

 

Plants selected suitable for type of development

 

Crime prevention principals utilised

 

Site Selection Includes

Compatible topography with proposed use

 

Accessibility to open space safe and inclusive

 

Capacity to provide a range of activities

 

Appropriate sites for parkland development

 

Playground Design Includes

Appropriate and variety of play equipment

 

Appropriate siting of play equipment

 

Appropriate installation and undersurfacing of play equipment

 

Provision of seating

 

Refer also to the following:

City of Casey Landscape Policy

 

Relevant Indigenous Plant Zone

 

City of Casey Weed list

 

Casey Contacts

For further information please contact: Landscape and Precinct Design Team

Phone: 9705 5200

Fax: 9705 5202

caseycc@casey.vic.gov.au

References

Melbourne 2030 Planning for sustainable growth – October 2002, Department ofInfrastructure, State Government of Victoria

Safer Design Guidelines for Victoria – June 2005, The State Government of VictoriaHealthy by Design Policy – June 2004, National Heart Foundation of AustraliaNative Vegetation Management – A Framework for Action – 2002, Department NRECasey C21 Strategy – September 2002, City of Casey

Casey Local Roads Tree Strategy – December 2006, City of CaseyCasey Collector Roads Tree Strategy – July 2006, City of CaseyCasey Arterial Road Tree Strategy – October 2003, City of CaseyIndigenous Plant Guide - Current, City of Casey

Casey Planning Scheme – August 1999, Department of Infrastructure, State Governmentof Victoria

Casey Standard Drawings – July 2006, City of Casey

Casey Sustainable Watering Policy for Parks and Gardens – November 2002 City ofCasey

City of Casey Tree Manual – April 2005, City of CaseyCity of Casey Weed List – Current, City of CaseyCouncil Plan 2009-2013 – June 23, 2009, City of Casey

 

Disclaimer

Council policy documents change from time to time and it is recommended that you consult the electronic reference copy at www.casey.vic.gov.au/policiesstrategies to ensure that you have the current version. Alternatively you may contact Customer Service on 9705 5200.

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