Community Facility Directional Signage Policy | City of Casey
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Community Facility Directional Signage Policy

Version 1.3

1. Purpose

This policy provides guidelines for the installation of Community Facility Directional Signs and Tourist and Services Signs within the City of Casey. It is the intent that the signs be provided in a uniform manner, consistent with other Road Authorities so that they are easily identified/located and understood by the motorist. Driving a car in an urban environment is a complex task requiring continuous and rapid decision making

2. Definitions

Council means Casey City Council, being a body corporate constituted as a municipal Council under the Local Government Act 1989
Councillors means the individuals holding the office of a member of Casey City Council
Council officer means the Chief Executive Officer and staff of Council appointed by the Chief Executive Officer

3. Scope

This policy seeks to provide a balance between overloading the road environment with generally superfluous information and assisting the motorist seeking a specific destination.

For traffic signs to be effective they need to:

  • Cover an identified need;
  • Catch the driver’s attention;
  • Communicate a simple and understandable message; 
  • Be respected by the driver;
  • Be positioned to allow enough time for appropriate action;
  • Be uniform in appearance.

It is neither desirable nor practical to install information signs for every business and activity that occurs along our streets.

As such this policy seeks to set guidelines for the situations where signs are considered warranted on the basis of providing directional signage to community facilities and some high traffic generation activities which are located on a side street.

4. Avoiding Sign Proliferation

A proliferation of community facility name signs, together with a street name sign at the same location can render all of the signs ineffective, as motorists will have difficulty scanning all the information and making decisions within the time available. Even in large urban areas where people are not familiar with all districts, street directories are a low cost reference available to the majority of road users. GPS Guidance devices are becoming a common car accessory and the addresses of commercial facilities are usually listed in telephone directories and websites.

To maintain the effectiveness of community facility signage, the following guidelines are recommended:

a) Where a community facility abuts a major road, signage other than on the property should not be provided.

b) Where a community facility abuts a street which runs directly off a major road, no signage should be provided to it unless there may be uncertainty about the direction to take as may be the case where the street name is the same on both sides of the major road.

c) A desirable maximum of two facilities and absolute maximum of three facilities should be signposted at any location on a first-come, first-served basis.

d) The number of signs provided for a facility should be kept to a minimum and should generally be only provided on the most direct access route.

(A “major” road is defined as a road having an arterial function. These roads will normally be well defined in the road network and clearly identified with guide signs at significant intersections.)

5. General

For the purpose of this policy, Community facilities are described as facilities that are likely to be sought by significant numbers of visitors to a district. Inclusion of group commercial centres, such as shopping centres, is acceptable, but not individual commercial establishments, with the exception of a local shop that may be sought after by people unfamiliar with the area. Commercially run Council facilities are not necessarily considered to be “Community Facilities”. As such, the facility should be assessed as to whether it provides:

  • a broad community service function (as opposed to serving a select clientele on a commercial basis);
  • is likely to be sought by significant numbers of visitors to a district; and 
  • has a difficult to identify access route, located without direct abuttal to a main road.

6.Typical types of facilities, which could meet the description of ‘Community Facility’, are:

 

Towns Halls and Community Meeting Rooms

May be signed by name.

Civic Centres, Municipal Offices, Depots

These are clearly community facilities, accessed for meetings, public functions and community information or services. Depot operations play an important function particularly during emergency response situations.

Tipping Facilities

Commercial tipping operations should be assessed on the basis of accessibility to and use by the general public, ease of identification of access route and likely traffic generation.

Hospitals

Private Hospitals should be assessed on the basis of accessibility to and use by the general public, ease of identification of access route and traffic generation.

Medical Centres

Local medical centres would not generally meet the guidelines however in the interest of maximising identification in an emergency, these facilities where located off a main road could be identified with a “MEDICAL CENTRE” sign.

Veterinary Clinic

Local veterinary clinics would not generally meet the guidelines.

Sporting and Recreational grounds and facilities

Commercial sporting facilities should be assessed on the basis of location/ease of access and their use by community based sporting clubs for inter-club competition. It is essential to identify the reserve/facility rather than individual clubs given the potential for a number of signs to be requested for some locations, and allocation of grounds varying from year to year.

Commercial Entertainment Venues

Commercial entertainment facilities should be assessed on the basis of location/ease of access and their use of community based clubs for inter- club competition. They are not generally considered as a community facility.

Tertiary Education Facilities

Tertiary institutions have a regional function.

Schools

Primary and Secondary schools will be considered for directional signage if they meet the criteria laid out in the ‘Avoiding sign proliferation’ section of the directional signage policy.

A maximum of one directional sign for each school facility will be considered to avoid a proliferation of community facility name signage at intersections throughout the City of Casey.

PreSchool/Childminding Centre

Preschool/Child-minding Centres will be considered for directional signage if they meet the criteria laid out in the ‘Avoiding sign proliferation’ section of the directional signage policy. A maximum of one directional sign for each school facility will be considered to avoid a proliferation of community facility name signage at intersections throughout the City of Casey.

Churches and Religious Institutions

A denominational name may be included on signs indicating church.

Other non-profit institutions

In assessing facilities such as RSL Clubs, Bowling Clubs etc, consideration should be given to what component of the facility has a non-profit basis and what is taken up by commercial operations.

Railway/Bus Interchanges

These may be signed where the interchange is not readily visible from the road.

Post Office

May be signed by name and may include a red Australia Post symbol.

Shopping Centres

The need for signs identifying the centre should be based on the expected catchment of the centre and the ease of locating the centre. A local shopping centre servicing a local community need not be signed unless difficult to locate. The signs should identify the precinct or centre, rather than individual commercial operations. (i.e. use “SHOPS” OR “PRECINCT NAME”). Retail outlets such as milk bars and take-away food outlets, particularly in industrial areas, do not meet the guidelines for a community facility sign, although consideration could be given to the provision of a “SHOP” sign as outlined above. Larger centres can be identified by name and if not on an arterial road, with a directional sign at the nearest arterial connection. As specific facilities are likely to be sought by name, the shortest name by which the facility is commonly known should be shown on signs. A denominational name may be included on signs indicating churches

7. Sign Shape and Colour

Community Facility Directional signs shall generally be of rectangular shape and in similar format to street name fingerboards. Colours used will be WHITE lettering on a BLUE reflective background. Where the facility name requires only a single line, the minimum depth of the sign shall be 150mm and the lettering used shall be at least 100mm in height. Where two lines are required, the minimum depth of the sign shall be 240mm.

Where the orientation of the sign does not adequately indicate the direction to the street, e.g. at exits to some roundabouts, an arrow may be incorporated in the sign. (refer AS 1742.2 Clause 2.5.3.5 and AS 1742.5 Clause 6)

Organisation Logos should not generally be used as they require larger sign plates, increase the costs due to additional artwork etc, and provide additional information that the motorists must interpret.

8. Location

Signs will be provided at intersections to direct road users to community facilities located on side streets. They are not normally provided for facilities which abut a major road. Signs are normally provided at a single location to indicate the most convenient route to the facility from the nearest major road.

Signing at two or more locations should be used only when the facility generates an appreciable amount of traffic, where similar convenient routes originate at widely separated points on major roads, or where a number of alternative routes are needed to accommodate the traffic volume.

9. Mounting

Signs are placed in the same location as the street name signs and are normally mounted immediately below the street sign.

10. Sign Posting to Major Facilities

At facilities which generate large amounts of traffic, such as universities, major sporting venues, or large regional shopping centres, conventional direction signage as described in AS 1742.2 Clause 2.5 using the G1 and G2 series signs may be required for proper traffic management.

11. Tourist and Services Signs

Signing of facilities which are primarily of interest to tourists shall be in accordance with the Tourist Signing Guidelines Edition 4.122009 VicRoads. These guidelines set out in detail the process for considering applications and design details for signs approved under the guidelines.

Applications for signs on Council roads will be processed by Council officers and for roads under VicRoads control, forwarded to VicRoads for consideration.

12. Financial and Administrative Details

 Costs

Signs relating to community facilities under Council control shall be provided by Council at full Council cost.

Approved signs for other facilities shall be installed and maintained by the Responsible Highway Authority being either Council or VicRoads, at full cost to the respective organisation requesting the signs. Replacement for any reason shall also be at full cost to the organisation/facility associated with the sign. The Federal Government “Goods & Services Tax” will apply to these signs.

An administrative charge as set in Council’s annual fees and charges review will be included in the cost of the sign applications.

13. Ownership of Signs

The applicant who pays for the provision of Community Facility Directional Signage remains responsible for their maintenance and upkeep, subject to and in accordance with the road authority’s sign permit.

The sign permit will detail a number of conditions including:

  • Standards and specifications relating to sign construction, installation and maintenance;
  • Responsibilities in relation to cost, maintenance and removal;
  • Conditions under which the road authority may remove any sign; and
  • Conditions relating to the continuing operation of the tourist or services establishment.

It is the applicant’s responsibility to immediately notify the relevant road authority to arrange for the removal of all road signing to the property in the event of the facility closing or it is no longer an eligible community facility. Costs for undertaking this work will be charged to the facility operator.

14. Permit Period

The sign permit issued by Council grants to the applicant the right to use the portion of roadside reserve for a period of five years, after which time the appropriateness and efficacy of the sign may be reassessed.

However, Council maintains the right to replace or remove any signs installed on roads under its control when any of the following occurs:

  • The facility no longer conforms with the conditions of the sign approval;
  • The sign is in a poor state of repair;
  • The facility no longer operates as an eligible community facility or the facility ceases to operate;
  • There is a demonstrated need for aggregating signs in a particular location; or 
  • The road authority/Council needs to resume the land. Costs for undertaking the first three instances above will be charged to the facility operator.

15. Approval to Install Signs

In accordance with the VicRoads guidelines for Tourist & Services Signing, where signs have been/are installed by Council, these signs may remain at Council’s discretion until they are reviewed in accordance with this policy, or are no longer considered serviceable. Upon review, signs that do not conform to the policy will be removed by Council following appropriate prior notice being given to the respective organisation. Signs that are no longer serviceable, will be accessed in accordance with the above guidelines prior to approval being considered for their replacement.

16. Installation and Maintenance

Installation and maintenance of the signs will be undertaken by the Responsible Highway Authority. The need for sign repairs or replacement shall be at the discretion of the Responsible Highway Authority. The cost of maintaining the signs including damage or vandalism, replacement, reinstatement and/or re-erection is the responsibility of the applicant, or in the case of Council facilities, Council.

17. Alternative Information Methods

Where requests for information signs are received from facilities that do not meet these guidelines, the existing Street Name signs in the area should be reviewed to ensure the streets are clearly identifiable. Signs should be clearly legible at day and night from all directions, and free from obstructions such as trees etc. Where the existing signs are in poor condition, new signs with reflective materials should be installed.

18. Pre-existing Signs to Policy Adoption

Pre-existing signage will be allowed to remain at Council’s discretion, however, Council maintains the right to replace or remove any signs installed on roads under its control when any of the following occurs:

  • The facility no longer conforms with the conditions of the sign approval;
  • The sign is in a poor state of repair;
  • The facility no longer operates as an eligible community facility or the facility ceases to operate;
  • There is a demonstrated need for aggregating signs in a particular location; or
  • The road authority needs to resume the land.

Replacement of any existing signage will be subject to the conditions of this Policy and will require a new application. Replacement signage will only be approved in accordance with this Policy and prior existence of signs does not infer automatic approval for new signage.

19. Administrative Updates

It is recognised that, from time to time, circumstances may change leading to the need for minor administrative changes to this document. Where an update does not materially alter this document, such a change may be made administratively. Examples include a change to the name of a Council department, a change to the name of a Federal or State Government department, and a minor update to legislation which does not have a material impact. However, any change or update which materially alters this document must be by resolution of Council.

20. References

This policy has been developed with reference to:

  • AS 1742.2 – 2009 Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices – Traffic control devices for general use.
  • AS 1742.5 - 1997 Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices - Part 5 Street Name and Community Facility Name Signs, Standards Australia.
  • Traffic Engineering Manual Vol. 2 Directional Signs and Route Numbering (non-Freeway) Edition 3 September 2003.
  • Tourist Signing Guidelines Edition 4.12, 2009 Vic Roads. 21.

21. Review

The next review of this document is scheduled for completion by 18 September 2019.