Annual Report | City of Casey
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City of Casey
Annual Report
2018-2019
View from the 1001 steps in Narre Warren North
Casey playhouse exhibition in the Bunjil Place foyer

Year in review

Welcome to the City of Casey’s Annual Report 2018-19.

The Annual Report is the primary means of updating the community about Council’s performance during the financial year.

In the past twelve months we have celebrated many achievements. We’re excited to seize new opportunities, evolve and transform to achieve even more for our community.

The City of Casey is an exciting place to be as we strive to create Australia’s most liveable city.

Major capital works

Autumn Place Community Hub

Doveton welcomed a new and improved family and community facility when the Autumn Place Community Hub opened in May 2019.

The $5.27 million project included the revitalisation and expansion of the facility. Updates include:

  • Updating and expanding the former kindergarten
  • Two new Maternal and Child Health consulting rooms
  • A new large multipurpose community room with adjoining kitchen and courtyard

This project is one of the priorities outlined in the Autumn Place Masterplan. Council consulted with the community to develop the masterplan.

Council also collaborated with local children to write a storybook called The Fantastic World of Autumn Place. The children’s book is about the community hub.  Residents can find characters from the book in the upgraded park in the precinct.

State Government Growing Suburbs Fund grant ($3.6 million) and the City of Casey ($1.6 million) funded the project.

Casey Stadium stage 2 complete

In June 2019, Casey celebrated the completion of the major redevelopment of Casey Stadium. It delivered a much-needed boost for indoor sports in the city.

Features of the $7.3 million Stage 2 project include:

  • New and upgraded multipurpose courts for basketball, netball, badminton and volleyball. It also includes a mini-show court
  • 1,300 sqm gymnastics hall to cater for recreation, competition and all abilities
  • Five dual-use cricket/soccer courts and six cricket training lanes
  • Refurbished café and lounge space
  • Upgraded bathrooms as well as male, female and accessible change rooms

Casey Stadium is now a premier, year-round venue for indoor sport and recreation. The stadium will create new opportunities for the community.

City of Casey ($5.815 million), Victorian Government ($650,000), YMCA and Cricket Victoria funded this project.

Casey Fields Regional Community Soccer Precinct

In February 2019, works began on the new soccer facilities at Casey Fields. 

The $18 million project makes it possible for more people to play soccer. It will create opportunities to bring professional sport to our city. The project will also deliver further social, economic and environmental benefits.

This exciting project will deliver:

  • Four soccer pitches, including three synthetic and one natural turf
  • Floodlighting, fencing, coaches boxes and goals
  • A regional pavilion with a community room, unisex player and referee changing rooms. It will also have public toilets, storerooms, kitchen and canteen
  • Paths, landscaping and public art entrance
  • Approximately 200 extra car parks

The Growth Areas Infrastructure Contribution Fund ($5 million) and the City of Casey ($13 million) funded this project.

Endeavour Hills Community Precinct

After completing Stage 1 in 2016, Stage 2 works began to improve the Endeavour Hills Community Precinct.

With completion expected in 2020, the $3.36 million project will deliver:

  • A regional skate park with over 865m2 of skate-able terrain. This includes a street course and various bowls. It caters for beginners through to experienced skaters and scooter riders
  • Playground, terraced landscaping, lawn area for events
  • Installation of gymnastics and parkour equipment

Late in 2019, Council invited the community to help name the precinct through an online poll. The final name will be announced in the new financial year.

The City of Casey ($1.68 million) and a grant from the State Government through the Growing Suburbs Fund ($1.68 million) funded this project. 

Chalcot Lodge Family and Community Centre

The Chalcot Lodge Family and Community Centre’s $782,000 makeover included:

  • The redevelopment of the Maternal and Child Health area. This includes an open plan, multipurpose community room with a new kitchen, amenities and storage area
  • A new community outdoor play area
  • Renewal of the existing kindergarten space. This included upgrades to existing fittings, furnishings and equipment
  • A refresh of the facade and surrounding front landscape, with new signage also on the way

Livingston Family and Community Centre

The growing Cranbourne East community welcomed the opening of the new Livingston Family and Community Centre during August 2018.

The $5.71 million integrated community facility now features:

  • Three kindergarten rooms
  • Two Maternal and Child Health consulting rooms
  • Intergenerational community spaces for hire. This includes a meeting room and large, flexible community room with an outdoor yard, barbeque and a community kitchen

Marriott Waters Family and Community Centre redevelopment

Lyndhurst residents now have greater access to playgroups, community activities, social groups and cultural programs at the Marriott Waters Family and Community Centre thanks to a $1.18 million redevelopment.

In June 2019, the centre was reopened with the following upgrades:

  • An additional 150sqm multipurpose community room
  • Community kitchen
  • Large indoor/outdoor storage space
  • Family changeroom
  • Secure outdoor courtyard

Strathaird Children’s Centre

In March 2019, Strathaird Family and Community Centre celebrated the completion of its $2.8 million redevelopment project. It delivered more community facilities and upgrades for the Narre Warren South community.

The redevelopments included:

  • An extra consulting room for Maternal and Child Health services
  • An extra four-year-old kindergarten room
  • An outdoor play area
  • Upgrades to the existing large multipurpose community room. These include modern audiovisual technology, a kitchen, courtyard and an extra community meeting room.

Autumn Place Community Hub

Autumn Place Community Hub

Doveton welcomed a new and improved family and community facility when the Autumn Place Community Hub opened in May 2019.

The $5.27 million project included the revitalisation and expansion of the facility. Updates include:

  • Updating and expanding the former kindergarten
  • Two new Maternal and Child Health consulting rooms
  • A new large multipurpose community room with adjoining kitchen and courtyard

This project is one of the priorities outlined in the Autumn Place Masterplan. Council consulted with the community to develop the masterplan.

Council also collaborated with local children to write a storybook called The Fantastic World of Autumn Place. The children’s book is about the community hub.  Residents can find characters from the book in the upgraded park in the precinct.

State Government Growing Suburbs Fund grant ($3.6 million) and the City of Casey ($1.6 million) funded the project.

Casey Stadium

Casey Stadium stage 2 complete

In June 2019, Casey celebrated the completion of the major redevelopment of Casey Stadium. It delivered a much-needed boost for indoor sports in the city.

Features of the $7.3 million Stage 2 project include:

  • New and upgraded multipurpose courts for basketball, netball, badminton and volleyball. It also includes a mini-show court
  • 1,300 sqm gymnastics hall to cater for recreation, competition and all abilities
  • Five dual-use cricket/soccer courts and six cricket training lanes
  • Refurbished café and lounge space
  • Upgraded bathrooms as well as male, female and accessible change rooms

Casey Stadium is now a premier, year-round venue for indoor sport and recreation. The stadium will create new opportunities for the community.

City of Casey ($5.815 million), Victorian Government ($650,000), YMCA and Cricket Victoria funded this project.

Casey Fields

Casey Fields Regional Community Soccer Precinct

In February 2019, works began on the new soccer facilities at Casey Fields. 

The $18 million project makes it possible for more people to play soccer. It will create opportunities to bring professional sport to our city. The project will also deliver further social, economic and environmental benefits.

This exciting project will deliver:

  • Four soccer pitches, including three synthetic and one natural turf
  • Floodlighting, fencing, coaches boxes and goals
  • A regional pavilion with a community room, unisex player and referee changing rooms. It will also have public toilets, storerooms, kitchen and canteen
  • Paths, landscaping and public art entrance
  • Approximately 200 extra car parks

The Growth Areas Infrastructure Contribution Fund ($5 million) and the City of Casey ($13 million) funded this project.

Endeavour Hills Precinct

Endeavour Hills Community Precinct

After completing Stage 1 in 2016, Stage 2 works began to improve the Endeavour Hills Community Precinct.

With completion expected in 2020, the $3.36 million project will deliver:

  • A regional skate park with over 865m2 of skate-able terrain. This includes a street course and various bowls. It caters for beginners through to experienced skaters and scooter riders
  • Playground, terraced landscaping, lawn area for events
  • Installation of gymnastics and parkour equipment

Late in 2019, Council invited the community to help name the precinct through an online poll. The final name will be announced in the new financial year.

The City of Casey ($1.68 million) and a grant from the State Government through the Growing Suburbs Fund ($1.68 million) funded this project. 

Community Centres

Chalcot Lodge Family and Community Centre

The Chalcot Lodge Family and Community Centre’s $782,000 makeover included:

  • The redevelopment of the Maternal and Child Health area. This includes an open plan, multipurpose community room with a new kitchen, amenities and storage area
  • A new community outdoor play area
  • Renewal of the existing kindergarten space. This included upgrades to existing fittings, furnishings and equipment
  • A refresh of the facade and surrounding front landscape, with new signage also on the way

Livingston Family and Community Centre

The growing Cranbourne East community welcomed the opening of the new Livingston Family and Community Centre during August 2018.

The $5.71 million integrated community facility now features:

  • Three kindergarten rooms
  • Two Maternal and Child Health consulting rooms
  • Intergenerational community spaces for hire. This includes a meeting room and large, flexible community room with an outdoor yard, barbeque and a community kitchen

Marriott Waters Family and Community Centre redevelopment

Lyndhurst residents now have greater access to playgroups, community activities, social groups and cultural programs at the Marriott Waters Family and Community Centre thanks to a $1.18 million redevelopment.

In June 2019, the centre was reopened with the following upgrades:

  • An additional 150sqm multipurpose community room
  • Community kitchen
  • Large indoor/outdoor storage space
  • Family changeroom
  • Secure outdoor courtyard

Strathaird Children’s Centre

In March 2019, Strathaird Family and Community Centre celebrated the completion of its $2.8 million redevelopment project. It delivered more community facilities and upgrades for the Narre Warren South community.

The redevelopments included:

  • An extra consulting room for Maternal and Child Health services
  • An extra four-year-old kindergarten room
  • An outdoor play area
  • Upgrades to the existing large multipurpose community room. These include modern audiovisual technology, a kitchen, courtyard and an extra community meeting room.

Major achievements

Commit to Casey

Casey undertook an advocacy campaign in the lead up to the 2018 Victorian state election and the 2019 federal election. The campaign focused on securing investment in road and rail projects across the municipality.

In partnership with the community, Council identified priority road projects. These projects represented some of Victoria’s worst bottlenecks that urgently needed fixing.

In the lead up the Victorian state election, more than 3,000 residents signed Commit to Casey petitions. They also emailed their local MPs, calling on them to fix our roads and extend Cranbourne Rail.

By harnessing the community’s people power Commit to Casey grew into one of the most successful campaigns in Victorian history. From this, our community is reaping the benefits of numerous funding commitments.

Understanding our customers experience

Our customers connect with us through various channels for different requests, services and information.

Council values each interaction with our community. It may be a quick question for our customer service team, delivery of a service or applying for a permit. Each enquiry requires time and effort to resolve.

Council’s customer experience tells us how our customers feel when they interact with us. It’s the sum of all experiences, both good and bad, that a customer has with any of our 66 services.

During 2018-19, extensive customer research was undertaken to better understand our customer experience. This research informed Council on what we need to deliver improved experiences. This research will guide the development of a Customer Experience Strategy in 2019-20

Smart Parking

Smart Parking sensors provide real-time information on parking through a cloud-based service. It sends data to smartphone apps and traffic signs to help visitors find parking spaces.

A total of 895 sensors are now installed across Bunjil Place precinct car parks. Visitors can use the Smart Parking app to find available parking spaces at Bunjil Place, Casey ARC and part of Fountain Gate’s parking.

The Smart Parking App also provides information on time restrictions on available spaces. This helps users find a space that best suits their visit.

The INNovation Crowd

The INNCrowd Program started in August 2018 to encourage innovators and entrepreneurs in the City of Casey. Council recognised that local businesses needed better support and launched the INNovation Crowd. It was a new initiative designed to support local start-ups in the Casey Cardinia Region.

The INNCrowd aims to drive Casey and Cardinia Shire’s entrepreneurial culture. It also aims to grow the region’s reputation as the start-up capital of Melbourne’s south east. It provides support to local entrepreneurs at all stages of their business development.

As part of the collaborative program, Council hosted an INNovation Summit in April 2019. The summit brought people together to discuss community needs, entrepreneurship and economic development.

Bunjil Place also held the inaugural TEDxCasey event on April 2019. Local speakers took to the stage to share their tales of achievement on a local, national or global scale.  

Child Safe Strategy

In response to the Victorian Betrayal of Trust Inquiry, the Victorian Government mandated seven Child Safe Standards. These standards apply to organisations that offer services to children and young people up to the age of 18 years.

The City of Casey is one of the largest providers of children services. Council commits to creating and maintaining a child-safe organisation. We embed child protection and abuse prevention in the everyday thinking and practice of all staff. This includes councillors, employees, contractors and volunteers. 

The City of Casey’s Child Safe Policy was first developed and adopted in 2016. Council revised the policy in 2019. Community members, community groups and service providers gave feedback on the policy via an online survey.

The survey showed the three most important aspects of child safety to the community are:

  • Strong relationships with police, child protection and the Commission for Children and Young People
  • Empowering the voices of children to speak about safety
  • Having a clear statement of commitment to Child Safety

In June 2019, Council endorsed its revised Child Safe Policy.

Commit to Casey

Commit to Casey

Casey undertook an advocacy campaign in the lead up to the 2018 Victorian state election and the 2019 federal election. The campaign focused on securing investment in road and rail projects across the municipality.

In partnership with the community, Council identified priority road projects. These projects represented some of Victoria’s worst bottlenecks that urgently needed fixing.

In the lead up the Victorian state election, more than 3,000 residents signed Commit to Casey petitions. They also emailed their local MPs, calling on them to fix our roads and extend Cranbourne Rail.

By harnessing the community’s people power Commit to Casey grew into one of the most successful campaigns in Victorian history. From this, our community is reaping the benefits of numerous funding commitments.

Customer Experience

Understanding our customers experience

Our customers connect with us through various channels for different requests, services and information.

Council values each interaction with our community. It may be a quick question for our customer service team, delivery of a service or applying for a permit. Each enquiry requires time and effort to resolve.

Council’s customer experience tells us how our customers feel when they interact with us. It’s the sum of all experiences, both good and bad, that a customer has with any of our 66 services.

During 2018-19, extensive customer research was undertaken to better understand our customer experience. This research informed Council on what we need to deliver improved experiences. This research will guide the development of a Customer Experience Strategy in 2019-20

Smart Parking

Smart Parking

Smart Parking sensors provide real-time information on parking through a cloud-based service. It sends data to smartphone apps and traffic signs to help visitors find parking spaces.

A total of 895 sensors are now installed across Bunjil Place precinct car parks. Visitors can use the Smart Parking app to find available parking spaces at Bunjil Place, Casey ARC and part of Fountain Gate’s parking.

The Smart Parking App also provides information on time restrictions on available spaces. This helps users find a space that best suits their visit.

The INNovation Crowd

The INNovation Crowd

The INNCrowd Program started in August 2018 to encourage innovators and entrepreneurs in the City of Casey. Council recognised that local businesses needed better support and launched the INNovation Crowd. It was a new initiative designed to support local start-ups in the Casey Cardinia Region.

The INNCrowd aims to drive Casey and Cardinia Shire’s entrepreneurial culture. It also aims to grow the region’s reputation as the start-up capital of Melbourne’s south east. It provides support to local entrepreneurs at all stages of their business development.

As part of the collaborative program, Council hosted an INNovation Summit in April 2019. The summit brought people together to discuss community needs, entrepreneurship and economic development.

Bunjil Place also held the inaugural TEDxCasey event on April 2019. Local speakers took to the stage to share their tales of achievement on a local, national or global scale.  

Child Safe Strategy

Child Safe Strategy

In response to the Victorian Betrayal of Trust Inquiry, the Victorian Government mandated seven Child Safe Standards. These standards apply to organisations that offer services to children and young people up to the age of 18 years.

The City of Casey is one of the largest providers of children services. Council commits to creating and maintaining a child-safe organisation. We embed child protection and abuse prevention in the everyday thinking and practice of all staff. This includes councillors, employees, contractors and volunteers. 

The City of Casey’s Child Safe Policy was first developed and adopted in 2016. Council revised the policy in 2019. Community members, community groups and service providers gave feedback on the policy via an online survey.

The survey showed the three most important aspects of child safety to the community are:

  • Strong relationships with police, child protection and the Commission for Children and Young People
  • Empowering the voices of children to speak about safety
  • Having a clear statement of commitment to Child Safety

In June 2019, Council endorsed its revised Child Safe Policy.

Our performance

The Annual Report 2018-19 outlines Council’s performance in relation to the Council Plan 2018-21. It sets out the city’s vision to be ‘Australia’s Most Liveable City’ as well as the eight Strategic Objectives.

Council’s performance for 2018-19 reports against each Strategic Objective to show what Council accomplished.

Strategic Objective 1 – A Leader in Applying Technology and Innovation

Utilising technology available in the City of Casey, Council will take opportunities to be innovative in their service delivery and operations, and empower community members to also utilise the available technology.

In 2018/19:

  • Council delivered a Casey-wide data communications (LoRaWAN) network. The network enables growth of smart device usage and sensing across Casey. It will also support the local community, businesses and academia. It will provide a simpler path for piloting and experimenting with these technologies.
  • Council delivered several other key projects including an artificial intelligence image recognition project with Federation University. Council also delivered a Smart Connected Seat at the Aboriginal Gathering Place.
  • Council provided ongoing support to the Minta Farm Innovation Precinct Project.
  • A new project that aims at enhancing customer service through a Cognitive Virtual Assistant commenced.
  • Casey continued to focus on increasing services and transactions available through digital channels. Council added three new digital transactions. These include reporting a bin collection issue, applying for an asset protection final inspection and changing extra recycling bin services.

Strategic Objective 2 – An Inclusive, Safe and Connected Community

All services and facilities that Council provides, funds and coordinates will be safe and inclusive for all City of Casey community members.

In 2018/19:

  • The number of active library members increased by 3.2% during 2018-19 (those who borrowed a library resource).
  • There were 59 Maternal and Child Health (MCH) programs conducted during the year. The proportion of children who participated in the MCH service during 2018-19 was 70.3%. This is a slight decrease from 72.93% in 2017-18.
  • Gymnastics and aquatics memberships increased by 8% with health club memberships bringing the overall increase to 7%.
  • Community sport saw a 27% increase in the amount of allocated Cricket Clubs from 44 across up to 56. This was across Summer 2018-19 and Winter 2019.
  • Neighbourhood houses and community centres also saw an overall increase in programs of 25%.

Strategic Objective 3 – A Council Whose Services and Facilities are Driven by Community Needs

As the community continues to grow, it is important that Council has a robust understanding of community needs through research and ongoing dialogue, to help ensure that services and facilities are effectively delivered and maintained.

In 2018/19:

  • The 2018/19 review program included five service reviews. Working groups are now in place and the initial information collection complete.
  • The Community Taskforce met twice during the financial year. First in September 2018 and again in March 2019. The workshop measured satisfaction of participants in September 2018. 100% of participants agree or strongly agree that they were satisfied with the level of engagement. This increased from 83% at a prior workshop held in June 2018.

Strategic Objective 4 – The destination for arts, culture, sport and leisure that attracts visitors and brings communities together

The City of Casey is already a popular destination, particularly for sports and leisure, with many high-quality facilities that are loved by residents and visitors. Council will continue to focus on enhancing and growing these facilities, providing more opportunities that help bring communities together.

In 2018/19:

  • Bunjil Place hosted a variety of arts and community events. These included shows in the theatre, exhibitions in the gallery, installations in the plaza, live music, films and studio shows.
  • The Bunjil Place Gallery delivered three special projects. It also produced four nation-leading exhibitions and 118 audience engagement activities.
  • The Bunjil Place Theatre hosted four internationally significant theatre shows. It also hosted seven nationally significant shows and five regionally significant shows.
  • ‘We Are, We Can, We Will’ provided three physical activity programs. These involved 49 women and girls, with cross promotional activities with the Melbourne Football Club.
  • Casey Stadium hosted two Victorian Netball League games. It also hosted the National Indoor Cricket Championships.
  • Female-friendly upgrades were completed on the Sweeney Recreation Reserve pavilion and Waratah Recreation Reserve. This improved facilities for the community.

Strategic Objective 5 – A city that sustainably plans and manages growth while protecting its diverse landscape

The City of Casey’s ‘city living, country feel’ is important to community members, and as the municipality rapidly grows and changes it is important that green and natural spaces are protected and enhanced, and that all environments are kept clean and healthy.

In 2018/19:

  • The community planted 14,600 trees and shrubs across four reserves.
  • Contractors planted 6,000 trees and shrubs across eight sites. The total trees planted for 2018-19 were 20,600, exceeding the target of 15,000 trees planted per year.
  • 10,000 plants were also given away as part of Council’s annual plant giveaway held in May 2019.
  • The community established three new Environmental Volunteer groups. This includes our first heritage-based Friends Group.
  • Council officers reviewed the delivery of Council delivered grants programs. This includes the Environmental Sustainability, Heritage and Biodiversity grant programs. During this time Council began promotion of its community planting programs. It also started engagement with local schools, community groups and individuals to support the planting of 20,000 trees.

Strategic Objective 6 – A thriving economy with local jobs, investment, and new industries

Through partnerships and city planning, Council will continue to prioritise facilitating and supporting job creation, particularly in new and emerging industries.

In 2018/19:

  • The INNCrowd Program commenced in August 2018. Its goal was to provide support to innovators and entrepreneurs in the City of Casey. Throughout the year, Council held several programs. These include the Innovation Summit and TEDxCasey with 1,070 attendees. There were also over 30 events including mentor sessions, masterclasses, ‘Humble Hustles’ and discussion groups.
  • A total of 3,881 participants were involved in business development programs.
  • Council undertook several initiatives to attract investment and drive new industries in Casey. These included:
    • Delivering the first Chinese Culture Festival, which attracted over 2,000 visitors
    • An art appreciation workshop attended by over 100 people
    • Storytelling and craft making events attracting over 250 people
    • Facilitating a local beverage business to build its distribution channel in Sichuan, China
    • Promoting Casey to six major Australian Chinese provincial business associations

Businesses in Casey

The number of businesses in Casey at 30 June 2019 was 22,349. This is an impressive 11.42% growth from the 20,058 registered businesses at 1 July 2018. It exceeded the target of a 5% growth.

Council also delivered several programs including the South East Careers Expo with 4,183 attendees. It also delivered a Successful Migrant Information Session with 13 attendees, the FedUni Casey Challenge, and three Industry Forums featuring Health and Nursing, Apprenticeships and Defence, with a total of 4,308 attendees.

Strategic Objective 7 – A city with an accessible and well-connected transport network

Council will plan, maintain and deliver within its capacity, and advocate when necessary, for a transport system that provides the City of Casey’s community with safe, accessible and efficient transport choices.

In 2018/19:

  • The Victorian and Australian Government responded to our push to address rapid population growth and liveability. They also responded to our calls for a fair share in road and rail funding.
  • The duplication of the rail line between Cranbourne and Dandenong construction should start in 2021 and finish by 2023. The Victorian Government are investigating the feasibility of an extension to Clyde.
  • It’s estimated that there’s more than $3 billion worth of investment in transport projects across the City of Casey.
  • There are currently over 20 major projects earmarked for the City of Casey. 
  • Council constructed up to 29 kilometres of shared path and trail networks. We achieved a 4.7% increase, bringing the total to 619 kilometres of path greater than 1.5 meters in width.

Strategic Objective 8 – An efficient and effective, customer focussed council with sufficient resources to meet priorities

Council will responsibly manage resources to deliver services that meet community needs.

In 2018/19 the 2019 Community Satisfaction Survey demonstrated:

  • A score of 74 out of 100 for the City of Casey's customer service. It’s the same score from the 2018 survey, but is still well ahead of the average interface council score of 69. It’s also ahead of the state average of 71.
  • An 'overall performance' score of 63 out of 100. This is a two-point increase from the 2018 survey. It puts the City of Casey above the average for interface councils at 61, and the state average of 60.

Strategic Objective 1

Strategic Objective 1 – A Leader in Applying Technology and Innovation

Utilising technology available in the City of Casey, Council will take opportunities to be innovative in their service delivery and operations, and empower community members to also utilise the available technology.

In 2018/19:

  • Council delivered a Casey-wide data communications (LoRaWAN) network. The network enables growth of smart device usage and sensing across Casey. It will also support the local community, businesses and academia. It will provide a simpler path for piloting and experimenting with these technologies.
  • Council delivered several other key projects including an artificial intelligence image recognition project with Federation University. Council also delivered a Smart Connected Seat at the Aboriginal Gathering Place.
  • Council provided ongoing support to the Minta Farm Innovation Precinct Project.
  • A new project that aims at enhancing customer service through a Cognitive Virtual Assistant commenced.
  • Casey continued to focus on increasing services and transactions available through digital channels. Council added three new digital transactions. These include reporting a bin collection issue, applying for an asset protection final inspection and changing extra recycling bin services.

Strategic Objective 2

Strategic Objective 2 – An Inclusive, Safe and Connected Community

All services and facilities that Council provides, funds and coordinates will be safe and inclusive for all City of Casey community members.

In 2018/19:

  • The number of active library members increased by 3.2% during 2018-19 (those who borrowed a library resource).
  • There were 59 Maternal and Child Health (MCH) programs conducted during the year. The proportion of children who participated in the MCH service during 2018-19 was 70.3%. This is a slight decrease from 72.93% in 2017-18.
  • Gymnastics and aquatics memberships increased by 8% with health club memberships bringing the overall increase to 7%.
  • Community sport saw a 27% increase in the amount of allocated Cricket Clubs from 44 across up to 56. This was across Summer 2018-19 and Winter 2019.
  • Neighbourhood houses and community centres also saw an overall increase in programs of 25%.

Strategic Objective 3

Strategic Objective 3 – A Council Whose Services and Facilities are Driven by Community Needs

As the community continues to grow, it is important that Council has a robust understanding of community needs through research and ongoing dialogue, to help ensure that services and facilities are effectively delivered and maintained.

In 2018/19:

  • The 2018/19 review program included five service reviews. Working groups are now in place and the initial information collection complete.
  • The Community Taskforce met twice during the financial year. First in September 2018 and again in March 2019. The workshop measured satisfaction of participants in September 2018. 100% of participants agree or strongly agree that they were satisfied with the level of engagement. This increased from 83% at a prior workshop held in June 2018.

Strategic Objective 4

Strategic Objective 4 – The destination for arts, culture, sport and leisure that attracts visitors and brings communities together

The City of Casey is already a popular destination, particularly for sports and leisure, with many high-quality facilities that are loved by residents and visitors. Council will continue to focus on enhancing and growing these facilities, providing more opportunities that help bring communities together.

In 2018/19:

  • Bunjil Place hosted a variety of arts and community events. These included shows in the theatre, exhibitions in the gallery, installations in the plaza, live music, films and studio shows.
  • The Bunjil Place Gallery delivered three special projects. It also produced four nation-leading exhibitions and 118 audience engagement activities.
  • The Bunjil Place Theatre hosted four internationally significant theatre shows. It also hosted seven nationally significant shows and five regionally significant shows.
  • ‘We Are, We Can, We Will’ provided three physical activity programs. These involved 49 women and girls, with cross promotional activities with the Melbourne Football Club.
  • Casey Stadium hosted two Victorian Netball League games. It also hosted the National Indoor Cricket Championships.
  • Female-friendly upgrades were completed on the Sweeney Recreation Reserve pavilion and Waratah Recreation Reserve. This improved facilities for the community.

Strategic Objective 5

Strategic Objective 5 – A city that sustainably plans and manages growth while protecting its diverse landscape

The City of Casey’s ‘city living, country feel’ is important to community members, and as the municipality rapidly grows and changes it is important that green and natural spaces are protected and enhanced, and that all environments are kept clean and healthy.

In 2018/19:

  • The community planted 14,600 trees and shrubs across four reserves.
  • Contractors planted 6,000 trees and shrubs across eight sites. The total trees planted for 2018-19 were 20,600, exceeding the target of 15,000 trees planted per year.
  • 10,000 plants were also given away as part of Council’s annual plant giveaway held in May 2019.
  • The community established three new Environmental Volunteer groups. This includes our first heritage-based Friends Group.
  • Council officers reviewed the delivery of Council delivered grants programs. This includes the Environmental Sustainability, Heritage and Biodiversity grant programs. During this time Council began promotion of its community planting programs. It also started engagement with local schools, community groups and individuals to support the planting of 20,000 trees.

Strategic Objective 6

Strategic Objective 6 – A thriving economy with local jobs, investment, and new industries

Through partnerships and city planning, Council will continue to prioritise facilitating and supporting job creation, particularly in new and emerging industries.

In 2018/19:

  • The INNCrowd Program commenced in August 2018. Its goal was to provide support to innovators and entrepreneurs in the City of Casey. Throughout the year, Council held several programs. These include the Innovation Summit and TEDxCasey with 1,070 attendees. There were also over 30 events including mentor sessions, masterclasses, ‘Humble Hustles’ and discussion groups.
  • A total of 3,881 participants were involved in business development programs.
  • Council undertook several initiatives to attract investment and drive new industries in Casey. These included:
    • Delivering the first Chinese Culture Festival, which attracted over 2,000 visitors
    • An art appreciation workshop attended by over 100 people
    • Storytelling and craft making events attracting over 250 people
    • Facilitating a local beverage business to build its distribution channel in Sichuan, China
    • Promoting Casey to six major Australian Chinese provincial business associations

Businesses in Casey

The number of businesses in Casey at 30 June 2019 was 22,349. This is an impressive 11.42% growth from the 20,058 registered businesses at 1 July 2018. It exceeded the target of a 5% growth.

Council also delivered several programs including the South East Careers Expo with 4,183 attendees. It also delivered a Successful Migrant Information Session with 13 attendees, the FedUni Casey Challenge, and three Industry Forums featuring Health and Nursing, Apprenticeships and Defence, with a total of 4,308 attendees.

Strategic Objective 7

Strategic Objective 7 – A city with an accessible and well-connected transport network

Council will plan, maintain and deliver within its capacity, and advocate when necessary, for a transport system that provides the City of Casey’s community with safe, accessible and efficient transport choices.

In 2018/19:

  • The Victorian and Australian Government responded to our push to address rapid population growth and liveability. They also responded to our calls for a fair share in road and rail funding.
  • The duplication of the rail line between Cranbourne and Dandenong construction should start in 2021 and finish by 2023. The Victorian Government are investigating the feasibility of an extension to Clyde.
  • It’s estimated that there’s more than $3 billion worth of investment in transport projects across the City of Casey.
  • There are currently over 20 major projects earmarked for the City of Casey. 
  • Council constructed up to 29 kilometres of shared path and trail networks. We achieved a 4.7% increase, bringing the total to 619 kilometres of path greater than 1.5 meters in width.

Strategic Objective 8

Strategic Objective 8 – An efficient and effective, customer focussed council with sufficient resources to meet priorities

Council will responsibly manage resources to deliver services that meet community needs.

In 2018/19 the 2019 Community Satisfaction Survey demonstrated:

  • A score of 74 out of 100 for the City of Casey's customer service. It’s the same score from the 2018 survey, but is still well ahead of the average interface council score of 69. It’s also ahead of the state average of 71.
  • An 'overall performance' score of 63 out of 100. This is a two-point increase from the 2018 survey. It puts the City of Casey above the average for interface councils at 61, and the state average of 60.

Our future

In September 2018, we welcomed our new CEO, Glenn Patterson, to the City of Casey. Glenn brought new enthusiasm and a wealth of experience to the City of Casey staff. He plans to build the organisation’s capabilities, cementing Council as a leader in the region and sector.

A new CEO was timely for Council as we began reviewing the Council Plan 2017-2021 and developed the Council Action Plan 2019/20. While these are annual projects, we approached them with fresh ideas and perspective.

We reshaped the Council Plan 2017-2021 through a robust community engagement program. It now better defines the strategic objectives and aligns more with related strategic plans. This clarity further enables Council to deliver on priority projects. These are the projects that matter most to the community, through the Council Action Plan 2019/20.

Council reviewed the Council Plan in early 2019. We made the decision to refine the eight objectives into three; people driven, a place to prosper and a high performing organisation.

These new strategic objectives reflect Council’s desire to better align its strategic direction and plans. Council also hopes to help the community and stakeholders better understand what our priorities are for the years ahead.

The structure of the strategic objectives and strategies in the Council Plan 17-21 from 1 July 2019 is:

Strategic objective Strategies
People driven
  • An inclusive, safe and connected community
  • A council whose services and facilities are driven by community needs
  • A city with an accessible and well-connected transport network
A place to prosper
  • The destination for arts, culture, sport and leisure that attracts visitors and brings communities together
  • A thriving economy with local jobs, investment and new industries
  • A city that sustainably plans and manages growth while protecting its diverse landscape
A high performing organisation
  • A leader in applying technology and innovation
  • An efficient and effective customer focussed Council with sufficient resources to meet priorities

Financial overview

The operating surplus reinforces the continued delivery of services and necessary community infrastructure. In 2019-19 Council achieved a surplus of $277.4 million. This surplus is higher than the prior year’s surplus of $239.1 million. This is due to higher levels of contributed assets from:

  • Subdivision ($189.7 million) and new estates transferring to Council. This is due to recent surges in the level of development activity across Casey.
  • Developer contributions from Development Contribution Plans that fund future approved projects ($53.3 million).
  • Capital grants for some projects ($19.5 million) and supplementary rates in line with development activity.

Short-term cash and other current financial assets at 30 June 2019 of $358.8 million increased from $353.7 million over the year. The profile of the capital works program affected these figures. This led to a slight improvement in the working capital ratio (current assets as a percentage of current liabilities) with 428% providing a satisfactory financial position above the target band of 120% to 200%.

Council’s debt ratio is measured by comparing interest-bearing loans and borrowings to rate revenue. At the end of 2018-19, this ratio was 26.5%, which was within the target band of up to 60%, and below Council’s preferred maximum of 40%. Council will progressively repay all existing loans over the following long-term financial plan period.

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